• It’s Time to Vote! Important Information for Voting on Tuesday, Nov. 6

    Important information for voting in the general election for federal, state, and local offices

    Polls are open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 6

    Absentee ballot deadline is today:  Oct 30 – last day to postmark an absentee ballot application

    You will be casting TWO votes for Democratic Congressional candidate Joe Morelle

    There are TWO elections for our Congressional representative, divided into two columns on your ballot.  You will cast one vote for the two-year Congressional term beginning in January 2019 and one vote to complete the unexpired term of former Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, beginning immediately. The Democratic candidate is Joe Morelle. If you want Mr. Morelle to fill both Louise Slaughter’s unexpired term AND fill the two-year term beginning in January, you must vote for him in BOTH COLUMNS.

    Click here to see a sample ballot.

    Don’t Know if You’re Registered to Vote or Where to Vote?

    Use Monroe County’s Online Voter site to find out if you are registered to vote, where you vote, the candidates for which you will be voting (sample ballots are not yet available, but will be soon), to change your voting information (e.g., change your address if you’ve moved), and to request an absentee ballot.

    Another great resource is Everything You Need to Know to Vote.

    Who are the Democrats on the Ballot?

    Federal level: 

    State level:

    Mr. Ciaccio and Ms. Gallaher are not running against each other as there are two openings on the Supreme Court so you may vote for both candidates.

    Local level (including representatives to the New York State Senate and the Assembly)

    Ms. Reid and Ms. Shepard are not running against each other as there are two openings on the Family Court so you may vote for both candidates.

    Other candidates will vary depending on where you live.  Click here to check your ballot.

    The Monroe County Board of Elections has a complete list of all candidates running in Monroe County in all parties for any elected office.

    Where can I get Information about the Candidates?

    Most candidates have Web sites where you can learn more about them. Do an Internet search using the candidate’s name to find their Web site or click on the live links above.

    In addition, a number of non-partisan groups offer candidate information. Examples are:
    The League of Women Voters – New York state
    The League of Women Voters (Rochester chapter)
    Ballotpedia, an encyclopedia of American politics and elections

     

  • Get Ready to Vote on Tuesday, November 6

    Get ready to vote in the general election for federal, state, and local offices on Tuesday, November 6. Polls are open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

    Deadlines

    • Oct 12 – last day to register to vote in person or to postmark a mailed-in registration form
    • Oct 30 – last day to postmark an absentee ballot application

    Don’t Know if You’re Registered to Vote or Where to Vote?

    Use Monroe County’s Online Voter site to find out if you are registered to vote, where you vote, the candidates for which you will be voting (sample ballots are not yet available, but will be soon), to change your voting information (e.g., change your address if you’ve moved), and to request an absentee ballot.

    Another great resource is Everything You Need to Know to Vote.

    How to Register to Vote

    The Monroe County Online Voter site can also be used if you need to register to vote (see the tab entitled “Register To Vote”).

    You will be taken to copy of the voter registration form that you can fill out and mail in. If you are registering in Monroe County, the mailing address is Monroe County Board of Elections, 39 Main St. W., Rochester, NY 14614. Mailing addresses for the Boards of Elections in other counties are on the form itself. Your voter registration form must be postmarked no later than Oct. 12.

    Click here for a Spanish version of the voter registration form.

    Click here to register online at the New York state Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) Web site, if you have a New York driver’s license, learner’s permit, or a non-driver identification card. Here’s the link to use:

    Eligibility to Vote

    You must be a United States citizen to register to vote.

    The minimum age for voting is 18 at the time of the election, so you may register if you are not yet 18 but will turn 18 before the election in which you wish to vote. So, for example, if you want to vote in the primary on September 13, you can register even if you’re only 17 as long as you will turn 18 by September 13. Similarly, you may register for the general election even if you’re now 17 as long as you will turn 18 by November 6. You do, of course, have to register by the appropriate registration deadlines specified above.

    If you are convicted felon, you are eligible to register to vote once you have completed your sentence including probation.

    Who are the Democrats the Ballot?

    Federal level: 

    State level:

    Mr. Ciaccio and Ms. Gallaher are not running against each other as there are two openings on the Supreme Court so you may vote for both candidates.

    Local level (including representatives to the New York State Senate and the Assembly)

    Ms. Reid and Ms. Shepard are not running against each other as there are two openings on the Family Court so you may vote for both candidates.

    Other candidates will vary depending on where you live.  Click here to check your ballot as we get closer to the election date.

    The Monroe County Board of Elections has a complete list of all candidates running in Monroe County in all parties for any elected office.

    Where can I get Information about the Candidates?

    Most candidates have Web sites where you can learn more about them. Do an Internet search using the candidate’s name to find their Web site.

    In addition, a number of non-partisan groups offer candidate information. Examples are:
    The League of Women Voters – New York state
    The League of Women Voters (Rochester chapter)
    Ballotpedia, an encyclopedia of American politics and elections

     

  • Brittaney Wells is Elected Chairwoman of the Monroe County Democratic Party

    Brittaney Wells accepted the nomination to become Chair of the Monroe County Democratic Party after receiving an overwhelming vote by city and town Democratic committee members at their meeting on October 3, 2018. Wells is the first African-American to hold this position locally.  

    In her acceptance, she said Monroe County Democrats must embrace a spirit of unity in order take full advantage of the opportunity Democrats have next year “to win the County’s Executive’s race.” “Tonight I accept your nomination and I am humbled by the trust you placed in me,” Wells said, adding that, “I want our efforts, this year and the next, to be a warning to the Republicans here, in Albany, and in Washington. Starting this year, the focus for the party is to win a congressional seat, the legislative and judicial races, and more.”

    Wells defined the Democratic principles that have guided her from early on as a member and officer of the Democratic Party and thanked party leaders who were present, including Mayor Lovely A. Warren, Majority Leader Joseph Morelle, Assemblyman David Gantt, County Clerk Adam Bello, and Sheriff Todd Baxter.  She stated that her agenda is to continue building bridges and said that in the past there was the impression of intra-party differences.  “This is a new day in the Monroe County Democratic Committee,” she said.

    Wells recalled the values that attracted her to vote and become a member of the Democratic Party.  “Whether it is respect for diversity, equal rights, immigration rights, health care access, LGBTQ protection, environmental protection, economic development and more, as Democrats, standing up to Republicans and defeating their
    dangerous policies is our job,” she said.

    In her closing remarks, Wells honored President John F. Kennedy by paraphrasing his answer to the question of what it is to be liberal: “If by a Democrat they mean someone who looks ahead and not behind, someone who welcomes new ideas without rigid reactions, someone who cares about the welfare of the people – their health, their housing, their schools, their jobs, their civil rights, and their civil liberties – someone who believes we can break through the stalemate and suspicions that grip us in our policies abroad, if that is what they mean by a Democrat, then I’m proud to say I’m a Democrat.”