• Democrats Elected to Office on Nov. 5: A Complete List

    County-wide, we unseated Republican incumbents in the County Executive and County Court Judges races and we claimed an open County Court Judge seat.

    Monroe County Executive: Adam Bello

    Monroe County Court Judges: Karen Bailey Turner and Michael Dollinger

    Democrats now hold 14 of 29 seats on the County Legislature. John Baynes beat the Republican incumbent in the 18th district, Michael Yudelson picked up a seat in the 13th district and Yversha Roman in the 26th district.

    County Legislature 10th: Howard Maffucci
    County Legislature 13th: Michael Yudelson
    County Legislature 14th: Justin Wilcox
    County Legislature 17th: Joe Morelle Jr.
    County Legislature 18th: John Baynes
    County Legislature 21st: Rachel Barnhart
    County Legislature 22nd: Vincent R. Felder
    County Legislature 23rd: Linda M. Hasman
    County Legislature 24th: Joshua Bauroth
    County Legislature 25th: John Lightfoot
    County Legislature 26th: Yversha Roman
    County Legislature 27th: Sabrina LaMar
    County Legislature 28th: Frank Keophetlasy
    County Legislature 29th: Ernest S. Flagler-Mitchell

    In the City of Rochester, Democrats won all four city council seats, all four seats on the school board, and both city court judgeships.

    Rochester City Council East: Mary Lupien
    Rochester City Council Northeast: Michael Patterson
    Rochester City Council Northwest: Jose Peo
    Rochester City Council South: LaShay Harris
    Rochester City School Board: Ricardo Adams, Beatriz LeBron, Amy Maloy, and Willa Powell
    Rochester City Court: Melissa Barrett and Nicole Morris

    In the Town of Brighton, all of the Democratic incumbents were re-elected.
    Brighton Town Supervisor: Bill Moehle
    Town Clerk: Dan Aman
    Town Board Members: Christopher Werner, Christine E. Corrado and Jason DiPonzio
    Town Justice: Karen Morris

    The Town of Henrietta’s Democratic incumbent supervisor was re-elected, two Democrats defeated two Republican incumbents for town justice positions, and a Democrat won one of two seats for town council. 
    Henrietta Town Supervisor: Steve Schultz
    Town Justices: Bob Cook and Sue Michel
    Town Council: Member Millie Sefranek

    In the Town of Irondequoit, the Democratic incumbent was re-elected to supervisor as was the incumbent town justice, and Democrats won two seats on the town council, defeating two Republican opponents.
    Irondequoit Town Supervisor: David A. Seeley
    Town Board Members: Patrina Freeman and John Perticone
    Town Justice: Pat Russi

    In the Town of Perinton, Democrats won a seat on the town council.
    Town Council: Mere Stockman-Broadbent

    A Democratic candidate in the Town of Pittsford won a seat on the town council.
    Town Council: Cathleen A. Koshykar

    The Democratic candidate in the Town of Rush defeated the Republican for supervisor, and a Democrat won a seat on the town council.
    Town Supervisor: Gerry Kusse
    Town Council: Amber Corbin

    In the Town of Webster, the Republican incumbent was defeated by his Democratic challenger.
    Town Supervisor: Tom Flaherty

    Democratic candidates in the Village of Fairport beat their two Republican opponents for village trustee.

    Trustee: Emily Mischler
    Trustee: Michael Folino 

  • You Did It!

    Friends,

    Yesterday Monroe Democrats made history. For the first time in 32 years the County Executive seat is blue. We elected the first African American woman to County Court Judge. We picked up seats in the County Legislature, electing the first Asian American and Latina to serve.

    We flipped Webster and Rush blue, and made Democratic gains in town board seats. None of this would have been possible without you. 

    Thanks to our grassroots supporters and Chairs Club members, the committee has the resources it needs to support our Democratic candidates and voters. Thanks to our Democratic allies in government and activism, we share a vision for the county toward which we made substantial progress.

    Last but far from least, none of this would have been possible without the unstoppable army of volunteers who sacrificed countless hours, and then some, for our incredible candidates across the board.

    This is what democracy looks like. Thank you. 

    I am so proud of ALL of our candidates, the Monroe County Democratic Committee’s (MCDC) largest slate in history, who delivered a powerful message of hope and promise for the future of our region. As Democrats, we all proved that the only way we can make change in Monroe County is by devoting ourselves to the cause as a united front. 

    Again, thank you for standing with Team MCDC. We are looking forward to keeping the momentum going and continuing to make history for Democrats in 2020. 

    Sincerely,

    Brittaney M. Wells

    Chairwoman

  • It’s Time to Vote: Important Information for Voting on Tuesday, Nov. 5, in Local and County Races

    It’s time to vote in the general election for local and county offices on Tuesday, November 5. Polls are open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

    Don’t Know if You’re Registered to Vote or Where to Vote?

    Use Monroe County’s Online Voter site to find out if you are registered to vote, where you vote, the candidates for which you will be voting (sample ballots are not yet available, but will be soon), to change your voting information (e.g., change your address if you’ve moved), and to request an absentee ballot.

    Another great resource is Everything You Need to Know to Vote.

    Who are the Democrats on the Ballot?

    There are many local races this year, so who’s on your ballot is going to vary depending on where you live. There are many races at the community level as well as at the county level, including County Supervisor. Use the Monroe County Online Voter site to see a sample ballot for your community.

    The Monroe County Board of Elections has a complete list of all candidates running in Monroe County in all parties for any elected office.

    Where can I get Information about the Candidates?

    Most candidates have Web sites where you can learn more about them. Do an Internet search using the candidate’s name to find their Web site.

    In addition, a number of non-partisan groups offer candidate information. Examples are:
    The League of Women Voters – New York state
    The League of Women Voters (Rochester chapter)
    Ballotpedia, an encyclopedia of American politics and elections

  • The Monroe County Democrats submit record-breaking number of County-Wide Petitions to the Board of Elections

    The Monroe County Democratic Committee is proud to submit our county-wide petitions for the 2019 election season.

    Our county-wide designated candidates– Clerk Adam Bello for County Executive, Shani Curry-Mitchell for District Attorney and both Karen Bailey Turner and Michael Dollinger for County Court Judge persisted through harsh weather conditions to obtain an abundance of signatures to be placed on this year’s ballot.

    “Despite entering into the petitioning season earlier than expected, we are gratified by the outpouring of volunteers and supporters–resulting in approximately 12,000 county-wide signatures to place our candidates on the ballot in November,” said MCDC Chairwoman Brittaney Wells

    “Given the shortened petition period and the sometimes not so cooperative weather I am really amazed to see this many pages in the Countywide Democratic petition that was filed with the Board of Elections.  In my 20+ years here at the Board I have not seen a filing this large by Democrats in Monroe County” said Board of Election Commissioner Thomas Ferrarese.

    Hundreds of volunteers turned out to walk alongside our candidates collecting more than 7xs the required number of signatures.  Democrats are energized and voters are eager for a change to an effective and transparent county government.

  • Unbought and Unbossed

    Chair Brittaney Wells guest article in Upstate NY Gospel Magazine in celebration of Women’s History month, read full article below.

    Speaker Nancy Pelosi said it best: “Women are leaders everywhere you look ― from the CEO who runs a Fortune 500 company to the housewife who raises her children and heads her household. Our country was built by strong women, and we will continue to break down walls and defy stereotypes.”

    Last year, women across our city and our nation proved just that!

    The surprising upset of Secretary Hillary Clinton losing the 2016 election to President Trump caused women everywhere to brawl on the front lines of the resistance. From shifting the power in the House of Representatives substantially with the historic class of the 116th Congress–where 127 women took the oath of office, to the election of New York State Attorney General Leticia “Tish” James, the first African-American to serve in the position for New York State, women are taking City Halls, legislative Chambers and the Halls of Congress by storm.

    The result of the 2018 election, ultimately and satisfactorily diversified the representation of the nation. For instance, the freshman class of the 116th Congress includes the first Muslim women, first Native American women, the first black women elected from Connecticut and Massachusetts, the first Hispanic women voted in from Texas and the youngest woman to ever be elected to Congress.

    California Congresswoman Maxine Waters has proven to ‘reclaim her time’ during her tenure when citing salacious acts. Rep. Waters single-handedly ignited a fire in women and young people everywhere by telling them to “get controversial” when standing up for the everyday working individuals as well as demanding respect while proclaiming she not receive different treatment than her male counterparts. New York Congresswoman Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman to serve in Congress, routinely makes headlines for challenging the status quo of the nation’s policies including lobbying loopholes and contributions from corporations. And, let’s not forget how after regaining the position of Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic Congress refused to give into Mr.Trump’s demands for his border wall, ultimately pushing him to admit defeat and ending the government shutdown.

    After a vicious primary and ultimate defeat of becoming Georgia’s first African-American Governor– for now — Stacey Abrams is an impactful presence and role model for women across the nation. By refusing to concede to her opponent until all ballots were counted, Abrams continued to shed light that everything is not-so “peachy” with the voting discrepancies experienced in Georgia. On Tuesday, February 19th, she testified before Congress regarding the matter.

    Women in the Greater Rochester Area are also breaking barriers. Hon. Fatimat O. Reid displayed the ultimate “girl power” after winning  November’s election and becoming the first African-American woman elected to Monroe County Family Court– while expecting her fourth child. NYS Assemblywoman Jamie Romeo joined the small percentage of women in the State Assembly. Fairport, NY “turned blue” when the Village elected its first Democratic Mayor, Julie Domaratz. And the Monroe County Democrats elected its first African American Chairwoman.

    Let us not forget Rochester’s own Mayor Lovely Warren, the city’s first female Mayor. Midway through her second term, she is continuing to transform the area daily with contemporary infrastructure, the fight for quality education, job security, and incentives that primarily benefit the residents who need them most.  Additionally, Mayor Warren was featured as 100 Woke Women in Essence Magazine in 2018, stating to be woke “means to take nothing for granted, that you are a part of the change you want to see. And staying woke means to wake up and realize that no one else is going to do this for you–you have to get out there and do the work. You have to want to climb that stairway. There’s no sitting on the sidelines for this.”

    Monroe County Democratic-endorsed candidates Shani Curry-Mitchell and Karen Bailey Turner are spearheading the 2019 election season in their own right with their boastful statements of rejuvenations for the county’s judicial system. Curry-Mitchell, a Spelman College graduate, is running for Monroe County District Attorney. Bailey Turner is a Jamaican-English immigrant, running for County Court Judge making her the first African American woman to serve in the role if elected.

    Two years have passed since women were placing their “I Voted Today” stickers on Susan B. Anthony’s grave-stone, in anticipation of the first Madame President.  In the recent months, six women, including Sen. Kirstin Gillibrand, Sen Elizabeth Warren, and Sen. Kamala Harris have all placed their bid for the 2020 presidential election. All women candidates platforms undoubtingly refute the policies of the current administration.

    Shirley Chisolm, the first African-American woman to run for President once said “America is composed of all kinds of people – part of the difficulty in our nation today is due to the fact that we are not utilizing the abilities and the talents of our brown and black people and females that have something to bring to the creativity and the rejuvenation and the revitalization of this country.”

    Today’s women are mirroring these words, bursting through that glass ceiling once built to marginalize them. Now living in an age where women are demanding their voice be heard, accreditation for their abilities, while paying homage to those who have paved the way.  Women across the U.S. are letting everyone know they are unbought and unbossed.

  • Democrat & Chronicle Editorial:

    Race-Baiting: GOP must stop its race-baiting in Dinolfo-Bello race

    “Race-baiting is not about vision, issues or candidate qualifications. It is about fear, mistrust and us-versus-them.”

    Monroe County deserves better– that is why we, the Monroe Democrats, are in full support of Hon. Adam Bello for County Executive.

    D&C: Op-Ed:

    Race-baiting is an ugly political trick. Rather than trying to unite voters around good ideas, race-baiting seeks to further split a community by exploiting its racial divisions. Race-baiting is not about vision, issues or candidate qualifications. It is about fear, mistrust, and us-versus-them.

    This type of campaigning has no place in Monroe County politics. Yet, this year, it is front and center in the Monroe County Republican Committee playbook.

    We call on Chairman Bill Reilich and Executive Director Ian Winner to stop this shameful practice. Now.

    Over the past two weeks, the Republican Committee has issued a series of press releases that focus on the contest for Monroe County Executive. Yet, these releases are not about Republican incumbent Cheryl Dinolfo’s achievements or what she hopes to accomplish in a second term. In fact, her name is barely mentioned.

    A bizarre connection

    The first release contained just 10 words, in the form of a question for Dinolfo’s Democratic opponent, Monroe County Clerk Adam Bello.

    Click here for full story.

  • STATEMENT REGARDING THE WINNING DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES OF THE 2019 DESIGNATION CONVENTION

    The Monroe Democratic Committee (MCDC) is honored to present the 2019 designated Democratic candidates. The announcement took place at the Annual Democratic Designating Convention on Wednesday, February 13, 2019, at 6:00 PM at the Holiday Inn – Downtown Rochester. MCDC Chairwoman Brittaney Wells introduced the endorsed candidates during the celebration.

    Adam Bello won the Democratic nomination for County Executive, pursuant to the announcement of his candidacy on February 9th at the Workers United Hall. Bello currently serves as County Clerk and was the former Town Supervisor of Irondequoit. “Our community needs a government as good as its people. No matter who you are, where you live, or who you know, you deserve the very best from those who serve you,” Bello said when announcing his campaign.

    Shani Curry Mitchell won the Democratic nomination as designated candidate for Monroe County District Attorney. Mitchell is an experienced prosecutor with over thirteen years of prosecutorial experience, most recently working at the Monroe County District Attorney’s office. Prior to relocating back to her hometown, Mitchell began her career in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office prosecuting cases from illegal drug possession to homicide. “As a prosecutor, I know that I will understand this community because I’m from this community. I grew up in the Southwest of the city, graduated from Wilson Magnet High School, and went on to Spelman College in Atlanta. After achieving my law degree, I knew that we needed to balance the demand for justice with the need for humanity in our legal system,” said Mitchell.

    MCDC nominates both Michael Dollinger and Karen Bailey Turner as designated candidates for Monroe County Court Judge, as two seats are available for election in 2019. “I am honored to accept the Monroe County Democratic Committee’s designation as a candidate for Monroe County Court Judge. As a lifelong resident of this community, I look forward to working hard to win this election so that I may continue to serve the citizens of Monroe County as County Court Judge,” said Dollinger when accepting the Democratic nomination. He currently serves as Judicial Law Clerk to Monroe County Court Judge Christopher S. Ciaccio, giving him the understanding of the role and the difficult decisions that come before the Court.  Before joining Judge Ciaccio’s chambers, Dollinger served the Rochester community as an Assistant District Attorney for over nine years having been hired by former District Attorney Michael Green. As a prosecutor, he was assigned to the Special Investigations Bureau and prosecuted crimes to get illegal guns and drugs off the streets.

    Bailey Turner is currently an Associate Attorney at the Mental Hygiene Legal Service, New York State Supreme Court, Appellate Division, Fourth Dept., where she represents mentally ill patients in civil proceedings before the County and Supreme Courts. Prior to her current position, Bailey Turner practiced criminal law for over 16 years, both as an Assistant Public Defender and in private practice. In addition, she has also represented civil rights cases in Federal Court. “The fair administration of justice requires that judges know and apply the law equitably; have integrity; treat the litigants who come before them with respect, and are willing and able to be confident, creative, courageous decision-makers who lead from the bench,” Bailey Turner said when announcing her campaign.

    The Honorable Melissa Barrett has obtained the Democratic designation for Rochester City Court Judge. Barrett was appointed to the bench as City Judge last December and seeks election to a full term. “The court’s goal is to provide fairness, respect, and dignity to all who come before it.  The public has a right to demand irreproachable and fair conduct from anyone performing a judicial function. Judges perform one of the most important jobs in our community and we need one who is experienced, committed to justice, and one who strives for the highest standard of integrity,” said Barrett.

    In addition, the Monroe Democrats also nominated Mark Muoio for City Court Judge. “I am deeply honored to receive the democratic nomination in my run for City Judge. I look forward to listening to our residents’ voices as I seek election,” said Muoio. He currently works as director of the Housing and Consumer Law Unit at the Legal Aid Society of Rochester – a nonprofit that provides “direct legal services to low- and moderate-income residents,” serving in that position since 2009.

    The County Legislators– City, Town and Villages– winning the designation nomination from the Democratic Committee are Michelle Ames of the 1st Legislative District (LD), Karen LoBacco of LD 2, Marvin Stepherson of LD 3, Josh Mack, Jr. of LD 4, Terry Daniele of LD 5, Daniel Maloney of LD 6, Jim Leary of the 7th LD, Megan Thompson of LD 8, Catherine Dean of LD 9, incumbent Howard Maffucci of LD 10, Joshua Foladare of LD 11, Michael Yudelson of LD 13, LD 14 incumbent- Justin Wilcox, Carl Fitzsimmons of LD 15, Lorie Barnum of LD 16, LD 17 incumbent Joseph Morelle, Jr., John Baynes for LD 18, James Cook for LD 20,  Victor Sanchez of LD 21, Vince Felder, incumbent, of LD 22, Linda M. Hasman of LD 23, incumbent Joshua Bauroth of LD 24, incumbent John Lightfoot of LD 25, Yversha Roman of LD 26th, incumbent Lashay Harris of LD 27, Frank Keophetlasy of LD 28, and, lastly, incumbent Ernest Flagler-Mitchell of LD 29.

    The Democratic nomination for Rochester City Council goes to Mary Lupien for the East District, Michael Patterson, incumbent, for the Northeast District, LaShana Boose for the Northwest District, and incumbent Adam McFadden for the South District.

    Lastly, the Monroe Democrats also are excited to announce the designated candidates for Rochester City School District Board members are: incumbent commissioner Judith Davis, educator Howard Eagle, Anthony Hall, and Amy Maloy.  

    The Monroe County Democratic Committee is confident that voters will choose to support our team of candidates this election year as our nominated individuals seek to create safer and more vibrant neighborhoods, greater employment and job security, and increase educational opportunities. We are confident that our slate of Democratic candidates embraces what we stand for as a party.

  • After Riding the Blue Wave, MCDC Leaders Back at Work

    Barely ten days after Monroe County Democrats joined the rest of the United States in riding the wave that ripped the U.S. House of Representatives’ majority away from Republicans, local town and city leaders gathered at Monroe County Democratic Committee (MDCD) headquarters for a workshop on November 15, 2018.

    The newly elected local officials, representing a number of Monroe County towns and the city of Rochester, will now join MCDC’s Executive Committee. The orientation and training session was led by MCDC’s Chair, Brittaney Wells. Wells welcomed everyone stating, “We prevailed in significant, very important electoral wins. We rode the wave with so many millions of other hopeful, hard working, determined Democrats around this county, our state, and our nation, but the work is not finished.” Wells added, “We continue moving, united, to complete our agenda on behalf of a more inclusive, fair, democratic, just, and economically prosperous Monroe County in all its districts.”

    As part of the agenda, the new leaders from across Monroe County received a preliminary work calendar for 2019, and they heard presentations and joined a question and answer session on topics related to outreach, leadership, communications, and general organizational processes in preparation for the 2019 election cycle. In addition to Ms. Wells, presenters included Tom Ferrarese, Monroe County Election Commissioner, Ernest S. Flagler-Mitchell, Monroe County legislator, and members of the Strategic Communications Committee, Joanne Greene-Blose, co-chair, and Daniel Mooney.

     

  • Monroe Democrats Celebrate Election Day Victories

    “This has been a big night for Democrats here in Rochester, Monroe County, across New York State, and America,” said Brittaney Wells, Chairwoman of the Monroe County Democratic Committee.  “Voters came out in droves to support sensible, hard-working Democratic candidates across the board, and we have started the ball rolling to take back our county next year and our country in two years.  The Democratic Party will move ahead after this election to offer voters candidates who will stand up for their values in next year’s local elections and beyond.  Today we gave voters a choice between policies, candidates, and government that believe America’s best days are ahead, and that our country, and the communities that make it up, are strongest when we celebrate and embrace the diversity that defines us.”

    Joe Morelle led the ticket for local Democrats with his resounding victory for the Congressional seat long held by Louise Slaughter.  Democrats also won local contests throughout Rochester and Monroe County and had strong showings for Governor Cuomo, Letitia James, Tom DiNapoli, state assembly, and other state-wide candidates.

    “Tonight local Democrats delivered, and I am grateful to Monroe County voters for their support of our party and its candidates,” said Chairwoman Wells.

  • It’s Time to Vote! Important Information for Voting on Tuesday, Nov. 6

    Important information for voting in the general election for federal, state, and local offices

    Polls are open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 6

    Absentee ballot deadline is today:  Oct 30 – last day to postmark an absentee ballot application

    You will be casting TWO votes for Democratic Congressional candidate Joe Morelle

    There are TWO elections for our Congressional representative, divided into two columns on your ballot.  You will cast one vote for the two-year Congressional term beginning in January 2019 and one vote to complete the unexpired term of former Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, beginning immediately. The Democratic candidate is Joe Morelle. If you want Mr. Morelle to fill both Louise Slaughter’s unexpired term AND fill the two-year term beginning in January, you must vote for him in BOTH COLUMNS.

    Click here to see a sample ballot.

    Don’t Know if You’re Registered to Vote or Where to Vote?

    Use Monroe County’s Online Voter site to find out if you are registered to vote, where you vote, the candidates for which you will be voting (sample ballots are not yet available, but will be soon), to change your voting information (e.g., change your address if you’ve moved), and to request an absentee ballot.

    Another great resource is Everything You Need to Know to Vote.

    Who are the Democrats on the Ballot?

    Federal level: 

    State level:

    Mr. Ciaccio and Ms. Gallaher are not running against each other as there are two openings on the Supreme Court so you may vote for both candidates.

    Local level (including representatives to the New York State Senate and the Assembly)

    Ms. Reid and Ms. Shepard are not running against each other as there are two openings on the Family Court so you may vote for both candidates.

    Other candidates will vary depending on where you live.  Click here to check your ballot.

    The Monroe County Board of Elections has a complete list of all candidates running in Monroe County in all parties for any elected office.

    Where can I get Information about the Candidates?

    Most candidates have Web sites where you can learn more about them. Do an Internet search using the candidate’s name to find their Web site or click on the live links above.

    In addition, a number of non-partisan groups offer candidate information. Examples are:
    The League of Women Voters – New York state
    The League of Women Voters (Rochester chapter)
    Ballotpedia, an encyclopedia of American politics and elections