• Election Day Info

    This year’s Primary Election is now one day away (TOMORROW!) on Tuesday, June 23rd! Here’s all you need to know to effectively cast your vote on Election Day:

    • First, please remember that due to COVID-19 polling sites have been condensed, and the location where you are voting may have changed. You can visit the Board of Elections website to find your Election Day polling location at this link: monroecounty.gov/etc/voter
    •  Next, make sure that if you are planning to vote by absentee, that your ballot is POSTMARKED BY JUNE 23rd. If you haven’t received your absentee ballots in the mail yet (2 ballots total, or 3 if you live in NY 27) then you should plan to cast your vote in person on Election Day.
    • Lastly, if you have any remaining questions about voting, please call our Get Out The Vote (GOTV) Voter Hotline at (585) 434-1620 for questions, court orders or if you need a ride to your polling place. Remember that if you are rejected at your polling place, you have the right to request a provisional ballot and a receipt for it. This is protected by Federal law.

    Your vote is important, and we’ll do all we can to make sure yours counts! When you’re out voting, remember to wear your mask and use safe social distancing whenever possible. Happy voting!


  • Voting: June 23rd Primary and Special Election

    As the Primary and Special Election approaches on Tuesday, June 23rd, there are some very important dates to be prepared for. Below, we’ve broken them down into sections of what to pay attention to: 

     

    ABSENTEE VOTING FOR NYS PRIMARY ELECTION

    1.) June 16th (6/16/20) – Last day to postmark an APPLICATION for a ballot

    • Every registered voter in NYS was sent an absentee ballot application in the mail with postage paid. You must either have the application filled out and mailed in to the Monroe County Board of Elections or have filled out an online application (link to the online application here) no later than June 16th (6/16/20) in order to receive an absentee ballot for the June 23rd Primary Election
    • Once again, when filling out the online application or paper application, follow the instructions at the top of the page, and begin the application by checking the box for “temporary illness.” 
    • You will receive two ballots within days for the local primary and presidential election.  If you live in the 27th Congressional District, you should receive three ballots to include the special congressional election.

    2.) June 23rd (6/22/20) –  Last day to postmark your absentee BALLOT 

    • Your absentee ballot must be postmarked by June 22nd in order for your vote to count. Don’t miss this deadline if you want your voice to be heard!

    3.) June 23rd (6/23/20)-  Last day to deliver your absentee ballot in person to the Monroe County Board of Elections 

    • While the easiest way to send in your vote is by mail, you can call ahead to the Board of Elections and schedule a time to turn in your absentee ballot in person. Check their website here (monroecounty.gov/elections) as this date approaches for their hours and times of operation. 

     

    EARLY VOTING

    If you prefer to vote early in-person for the Primary Election, this year there will be 12 locations across Monroe County starting on Saturday, June 13th (6/13/20) and running until Sunday, June 21st (06/21/20). 

    The locations are as follows:

    1.) City of Rochester Recreation Bureau – 57 St. Paul St., 2nd Floor, Rochester, NY 14604

    2.) David F. Gantt Community Center – 700 North St., Rochester, NY 14605

    3.) Arnett Branch Library – 310 Arnett Blvd., Rochester, NY 14619

    4.) City of Rochester Water Department – 10 Felix St., Rochester, NY 14608

    5.) SUNY Empire State College – 680 Westfall Rd., Rochester, NY 14620

    6.) North Greece Road Church of Christ – 1039 N. Greece Rd., Rochester, NY 14626

    7.) Marketplace Mall, North Entrance – 1 Miracle Mile Dr., Rochester, NY 14623

    8.) Irondequoit Public Library – 1290 Titus Ave., Rochester, NY 14617

    9.) Dolomite Lodge at Veterans Memorial Park – 1628 Jackson Rd., Penfield, NY 14526

    10.) Perinton Square Mall – 6720 Pittsford Palmyra Rd., Fairport, NY 14450

    11.) Lodge at Sweden Town Park – 4761 Redman Rd., Brockport, NY 14420

    12.) Webster Recreation Center – 1350 Chiyoda Dr., Webster, NY 14580

    The dates and times you will be able to vote early at these sites are as follows: 

    • Saturday, June 13                     9:00 am-3:00 pm
    • Sunday, June 14                      10:00 am-6:00 pm
    • Monday, June 15                      9:00 am-6:00 pm
    • Tuesday, June 16                    11:00 am-8:00 pm
    • Wednesday, June 17                9:00 am-6:00 pm
    • Thursday, June 18                  11:00 am-8:00 pm
    • Friday, June 19                         9:00 am-6:00 pm
    • Saturday, June 20                    9:00 am-3:00 pm
    • Sunday, June 21                       9:00 am-2:00 pm 

    REMINDER: remember while you’re out voting that there are TWO separate elections you’re voting in this year: the local primary plus the presidential primary. If you live in NY 27, that also means you’re voting in THREE separate elections this year with the Congressional Special Election.

    Traditionally, the presidential primary is held separately from the local primaries, this means that you would only be casting one ballot at a time on a normal year. Because the presidential primary was moved from April to June, we are now voting in both at the same time.

    There is signage within the polling centers to help with this and the staff can answer any questions you have! So, remember to sign in twice, at two separate tables- and if you’re in NY 27, you’ll sign in 3 times.

    If you voted already and didn’t cast all of your ballots, you can return to the polling site and cast your other ballots still. 

    ELECTION DAY VOTING

    Keep your eye out for any information mailed to you from the Monroe County Board of Elections as there condensed polling locations for Primary Election Day on Tuesday, June 23rd. To find the polling site where you’re registered to vote on Election Day, visit: monroecounty.gov/etc/voter/

    If you have any questions or concerns, please call our Voter Hotline at (585) 434-1620 or email info@monroedemocrats.com. You can also call the Monroe County Board of Elections at (585) 753-1550.

  • Democrats Elected to Office on Nov. 5: A Complete List

    County-wide, we unseated Republican incumbents in the County Executive and County Court Judges races and we claimed an open County Court Judge seat.

    Monroe County Executive: Adam Bello

    Monroe County Court Judges: Karen Bailey Turner and Michael Dollinger

    Democrats now hold 14 of 29 seats on the County Legislature. John Baynes beat the Republican incumbent in the 18th district, Michael Yudelson picked up a seat in the 13th district and Yversha Roman in the 26th district.

    County Legislature 10th: Howard Maffucci
    County Legislature 13th: Michael Yudelson
    County Legislature 14th: Justin Wilcox
    County Legislature 17th: Joe Morelle Jr.
    County Legislature 18th: John Baynes
    County Legislature 21st: Rachel Barnhart
    County Legislature 22nd: Vincent R. Felder
    County Legislature 23rd: Linda M. Hasman
    County Legislature 24th: Joshua Bauroth
    County Legislature 25th: John Lightfoot
    County Legislature 26th: Yversha Roman
    County Legislature 27th: Sabrina LaMar
    County Legislature 28th: Frank Keophetlasy
    County Legislature 29th: Ernest S. Flagler-Mitchell

    In the City of Rochester, Democrats won all four city council seats, all four seats on the school board, and both city court judgeships.

    Rochester City Council East: Mary Lupien
    Rochester City Council Northeast: Michael Patterson
    Rochester City Council Northwest: Jose Peo
    Rochester City Council South: LaShay Harris
    Rochester City School Board: Ricardo Adams, Beatriz LeBron, Amy Maloy, and Willa Powell
    Rochester City Court: Melissa Barrett and Nicole Morris

    In the Town of Brighton, all of the Democratic incumbents were re-elected.
    Brighton Town Supervisor: Bill Moehle
    Town Clerk: Dan Aman
    Town Board Members: Christopher Werner, Christine E. Corrado and Jason DiPonzio
    Town Justice: Karen Morris

    The Town of Henrietta’s Democratic incumbent supervisor was re-elected, two Democrats defeated two Republican incumbents for town justice positions, and a Democrat won one of two seats for town council. 
    Henrietta Town Supervisor: Steve Schultz
    Town Justices: Bob Cook and Sue Michel
    Town Council: Member Millie Sefranek

    In the Town of Irondequoit, the Democratic incumbent was re-elected to supervisor as was the incumbent town justice, and Democrats won two seats on the town council, defeating two Republican opponents.
    Irondequoit Town Supervisor: David A. Seeley
    Town Board Members: Patrina Freeman and John Perticone
    Town Justice: Pat Russi

    In the Town of Perinton, Democrats won a seat on the town council.
    Town Council: Mere Stockman-Broadbent

    A Democratic candidate in the Town of Pittsford won a seat on the town council.
    Town Council: Cathleen A. Koshykar

    The Democratic candidate in the Town of Rush defeated the Republican for supervisor, and a Democrat won a seat on the town council.
    Town Supervisor: Gerry Kusse
    Town Council: Amber Corbin

    In the Town of Webster, the Republican incumbent was defeated by his Democratic challenger.
    Town Supervisor: Tom Flaherty

    Democratic candidates in the Village of Fairport beat their two Republican opponents for village trustee.

    Trustee: Emily Mischler
    Trustee: Michael Folino 

  • You Did It!

    Friends,

    Yesterday Monroe Democrats made history. For the first time in 32 years the County Executive seat is blue. We elected the first African American woman to County Court Judge. We picked up seats in the County Legislature, electing the first Asian American and Latina to serve.

    We flipped Webster and Rush blue, and made Democratic gains in town board seats. None of this would have been possible without you. 

    Thanks to our grassroots supporters and Chairs Club members, the committee has the resources it needs to support our Democratic candidates and voters. Thanks to our Democratic allies in government and activism, we share a vision for the county toward which we made substantial progress.

    Last but far from least, none of this would have been possible without the unstoppable army of volunteers who sacrificed countless hours, and then some, for our incredible candidates across the board.

    This is what democracy looks like. Thank you. 

    I am so proud of ALL of our candidates, the Monroe County Democratic Committee’s (MCDC) largest slate in history, who delivered a powerful message of hope and promise for the future of our region. As Democrats, we all proved that the only way we can make change in Monroe County is by devoting ourselves to the cause as a united front. 

    Again, thank you for standing with Team MCDC. We are looking forward to keeping the momentum going and continuing to make history for Democrats in 2020. 

    Sincerely,

    Brittaney M. Wells

    Chairwoman

  • It’s Time to Vote: Important Information for Voting on Tuesday, Nov. 5, in Local and County Races

    It’s time to vote in the general election for local and county offices on Tuesday, November 5. Polls are open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

    Don’t Know if You’re Registered to Vote or Where to Vote?

    Use Monroe County’s Online Voter site to find out if you are registered to vote, where you vote, the candidates for which you will be voting (sample ballots are not yet available, but will be soon), to change your voting information (e.g., change your address if you’ve moved), and to request an absentee ballot.

    Another great resource is Everything You Need to Know to Vote.

    Who are the Democrats on the Ballot?

    There are many local races this year, so who’s on your ballot is going to vary depending on where you live. There are many races at the community level as well as at the county level, including County Supervisor. Use the Monroe County Online Voter site to see a sample ballot for your community.

    The Monroe County Board of Elections has a complete list of all candidates running in Monroe County in all parties for any elected office.

    Where can I get Information about the Candidates?

    Most candidates have Web sites where you can learn more about them. Do an Internet search using the candidate’s name to find their Web site.

    In addition, a number of non-partisan groups offer candidate information. Examples are:
    The League of Women Voters – New York state
    The League of Women Voters (Rochester chapter)
    Ballotpedia, an encyclopedia of American politics and elections

  • Unbought and Unbossed

    Chair Brittaney Wells guest article in Upstate NY Gospel Magazine in celebration of Women’s History month, read full article below.

    Speaker Nancy Pelosi said it best: “Women are leaders everywhere you look ― from the CEO who runs a Fortune 500 company to the housewife who raises her children and heads her household. Our country was built by strong women, and we will continue to break down walls and defy stereotypes.”

    Last year, women across our city and our nation proved just that!

    The surprising upset of Secretary Hillary Clinton losing the 2016 election to President Trump caused women everywhere to brawl on the front lines of the resistance. From shifting the power in the House of Representatives substantially with the historic class of the 116th Congress–where 127 women took the oath of office, to the election of New York State Attorney General Leticia “Tish” James, the first African-American to serve in the position for New York State, women are taking City Halls, legislative Chambers and the Halls of Congress by storm.

    The result of the 2018 election, ultimately and satisfactorily diversified the representation of the nation. For instance, the freshman class of the 116th Congress includes the first Muslim women, first Native American women, the first black women elected from Connecticut and Massachusetts, the first Hispanic women voted in from Texas and the youngest woman to ever be elected to Congress.

    California Congresswoman Maxine Waters has proven to ‘reclaim her time’ during her tenure when citing salacious acts. Rep. Waters single-handedly ignited a fire in women and young people everywhere by telling them to “get controversial” when standing up for the everyday working individuals as well as demanding respect while proclaiming she not receive different treatment than her male counterparts. New York Congresswoman Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman to serve in Congress, routinely makes headlines for challenging the status quo of the nation’s policies including lobbying loopholes and contributions from corporations. And, let’s not forget how after regaining the position of Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic Congress refused to give into Mr.Trump’s demands for his border wall, ultimately pushing him to admit defeat and ending the government shutdown.

    After a vicious primary and ultimate defeat of becoming Georgia’s first African-American Governor– for now — Stacey Abrams is an impactful presence and role model for women across the nation. By refusing to concede to her opponent until all ballots were counted, Abrams continued to shed light that everything is not-so “peachy” with the voting discrepancies experienced in Georgia. On Tuesday, February 19th, she testified before Congress regarding the matter.

    Women in the Greater Rochester Area are also breaking barriers. Hon. Fatimat O. Reid displayed the ultimate “girl power” after winning  November’s election and becoming the first African-American woman elected to Monroe County Family Court– while expecting her fourth child. NYS Assemblywoman Jamie Romeo joined the small percentage of women in the State Assembly. Fairport, NY “turned blue” when the Village elected its first Democratic Mayor, Julie Domaratz. And the Monroe County Democrats elected its first African American Chairwoman.

    Let us not forget Rochester’s own Mayor Lovely Warren, the city’s first female Mayor. Midway through her second term, she is continuing to transform the area daily with contemporary infrastructure, the fight for quality education, job security, and incentives that primarily benefit the residents who need them most.  Additionally, Mayor Warren was featured as 100 Woke Women in Essence Magazine in 2018, stating to be woke “means to take nothing for granted, that you are a part of the change you want to see. And staying woke means to wake up and realize that no one else is going to do this for you–you have to get out there and do the work. You have to want to climb that stairway. There’s no sitting on the sidelines for this.”

    Monroe County Democratic-endorsed candidates Shani Curry-Mitchell and Karen Bailey Turner are spearheading the 2019 election season in their own right with their boastful statements of rejuvenations for the county’s judicial system. Curry-Mitchell, a Spelman College graduate, is running for Monroe County District Attorney. Bailey Turner is a Jamaican-English immigrant, running for County Court Judge making her the first African American woman to serve in the role if elected.

    Two years have passed since women were placing their “I Voted Today” stickers on Susan B. Anthony’s grave-stone, in anticipation of the first Madame President.  In the recent months, six women, including Sen. Kirstin Gillibrand, Sen Elizabeth Warren, and Sen. Kamala Harris have all placed their bid for the 2020 presidential election. All women candidates platforms undoubtingly refute the policies of the current administration.

    Shirley Chisolm, the first African-American woman to run for President once said “America is composed of all kinds of people – part of the difficulty in our nation today is due to the fact that we are not utilizing the abilities and the talents of our brown and black people and females that have something to bring to the creativity and the rejuvenation and the revitalization of this country.”

    Today’s women are mirroring these words, bursting through that glass ceiling once built to marginalize them. Now living in an age where women are demanding their voice be heard, accreditation for their abilities, while paying homage to those who have paved the way.  Women across the U.S. are letting everyone know they are unbought and unbossed.

  • Candidate Profile: Jen Lunsford for NY State Senate

    Jen Lunsford is a lawyer, a mom, and a community volunteer running for the New York State Senate against Rich Funke in the 55th District.  Jen is 36 years old and resides in Penfield with her husband, Scott, a Pittsford native, and their two-year old son.  After graduating from Boston University School of Law in 2009, Jen moved to Rochester to begin her legal career.  Since then, she has worked to protect the interests of sick and disabled people through her work as an attorney, and to advocate for children as a volunteer with the Center for Youth.  Jen believes that public service works best when it actually serves the public.  She has pledged to hold regular public forums and open office hours throughout her district once she is elected.

    “Elected office is a customer service job. Too many elected officials forget who they work for and shut themselves off to opinions that differ from their own.  When you are given the privilege of serving your community you owe it to those you represent to hear them out, even if they didn’t vote for you or donate to your campaign.  When you are elected to office, you should represent everyone, even those who disagree with you.  Something I have learned over the course of my legal career, where I meet people from all walks of life, is that we are far more the same than we are different.  We all want the same things– quality schools, good healthcare, safe communities and good job opportunities for ourselves and our families– we just sometimes disagree about how to get there.”

     

     

  • Part I – Election Integrity Taking a Back Seat

    It sounds a bit like the premise of a Bond (or possible Austin Powers?) movie:

    Hoards of the best (and worst) hackers descend upon Las Vegas in a pair of events shrouded in silence and mystery with one nefarious purpose: hack the election.

    In this case though, the events are called Black Hat USA and DEF CON, and they recently wrapped up on the 12th of August, 2018.  DEF CON, and its more nefarious sibling, Black Hat, were back-to-back conferences for those interested in . . . let’s say “computer security and best practices.”

    Oh, and the circumvention thereof.

    This year’s DEF CON, the 26th, was themed “1983: The View from Dystopia’s Edge,” and true to this glaringly obvious tagline, the premise was about governmental security and the use of technology to control people (and their collective attention span).  Speakers had topics such as “A Journey Into Hexagon: Dissecting a Qualcomm Baseband” and “Hacking PLCs and Causing Havoc on Critical Infrastructures.”

    We all know the stereotypes.  Reclusive hackers with bad personal grooming and worse morals.  To be fair, in aggregate, those only fit in movies and in “presidential” debates that include He Who Will Not Be Named.  But with topics like these, it’s not a far stretch to imagine that the typical event-goer was of a different sort.

    Now, with all of this info, you might be tempted to box this passel of “nerds” away in your head as a means of dismissing them, but these folks are the real deal.  One of the headline speakers was Rob Joyce, Senior Advisor for Cybersecurity StrategyFor the NSA.  And if the NSA takes these people seriously, it’s a pretty solid indication that so should you.

    This year and last, DEF CON included a “Voting Village” made up of retired (but standard issue) voting machines used in elections around the United States.  The aged Diebold TSX machines (still in use in Georgia, by the by) were there, as well as others such as ES&S and WinVote.  It should inspire no confidence when you read the following headlines, then:

    To be fair, the 11-year-old hacker didn’t actually change the results of Florida’s presidential vote; she changed the displayed tally which, upon any further inspection, would have been shown to be incorrect.  And the 17-year-old hacker didn’t actually hack a state election; he used the same machines that are currently being used by various states in our union, and was able to fully modify votes, change candidate names, and even gave Gary Johnson (remember him?) 90 billion votes In one state.

    In case the lines weren’t drawn clearly enough for you: tweens and teens hacked regulation election equipment in under an hour.  What chance do our elections stand, as is, against a hostile nation? Now, I do not wish to dismiss the talent of these two young computer enthusiasts in the least, but they were in all likelihood far from the best hackers at either conference, and their efforts were part of a very public showing of how poor the computer and operational security is/was surrounding our voting machines.

    This type of activity, attempting to break, characterize flaws, and publish, is inherent to something called “white hat hacking,” and although this type of work might sometimes irk companies and institutions (who are often the very public recipients of shame for easy or trivial hacks, such as those on display at the Voting Village), the sum total of these activities is positive: they force a change that increases our security.

    Earlier on, I mentioned that DEF CON was part of a pair of conferences, the other being Black Hat.  Two guesses as to the intent of that conference?

  • Candidate Profile: Fatimat Reid for Family Court Judge

    The American Dream is alive and well in Fatimat Reid, a candidate for Monroe County Family Court Judge, who is a prime representative of this ideal. Her unique life story began in the state of New York, where she was born. As a child, her family moved to Nigeria, where she was raised during an important period of her life. She returned to the United States and then, at the age of ten, she became the subject of a Family Court custody action and spent time in foster care. These experiences give her a special perspective on Family Court. “I understand, from first-hand experience how frightening and frustrating court proceedings can be for children and all involved, particularly for those stricken by poverty and those with immigrant identity status.”

    Not only does Ms. Reid bring significant personal experience to the judicial bench from the perspective of a child involved in a family court case, she also brings extensive professional experience. Reid has established herself in the legal community as an attorney who has broad legal experience having served private practice as well as government entities. She currently serves as Chief of Staff for the Rochester City School District (RCSD). At RCSD she supports the school district’s mission of providing quality education while promoting wellness for all children and their families in the community. Ms. Reid commented, “I am honored to work in conjunction with educators and families serving the needs of all students”

    A passion for and knowledge of the law completes an impressive professional profile for Ms. Reid. She graduated from the University at Buffalo Law School and is a member of the Monroe County Bar Association, the Rochester Black Bar Association and the Greater Rochester Association for Women Attorneys. She began her legal career as an attorney with the law firm of Davidson Fink LLP and with Wolpoff and Abramson. Most recently, she has served as a City of Rochester Municipal Attorney and as an Associate Counsel for the Rochester City School District.

    Her campaign’s Web site lists and describes numerous awards and important recognitions that Fatimat Reid has received from the community and from professional organizations in Monroe County.

    When asked her perspective about current situations, such as the treatment many children and adolescents are experiencing at the U.S. southern border and other cases involving child abuse in Monroe County, she said that she will “adhere to and apply the law as it relates to each case that arrives in front of her with fairness and expediency.” In doing so, she always prioritizes “the well-being of children.”

    Reid also referenced the principles contained in the United Nations Declaration of Rights of the Child, adopted by the UN in 1989 and brought into force in September of 1990. That universal proclamation establishes the rights of the child with the goal that each child “may have a happy childhood and enjoy for his/her own good and for the good of society the rights to freedoms.” This document enshrines universal principles of justice that call “upon parents, men and women as individuals, voluntary organizations, local authorities and governments to recognize these rights and to strive for their observance,” concluded the judicial candidate for Family Court in Monroe County.

    Experience, fairness, and knowledge of the law: Fatimat Reid has it all!

  • Get Ready to Vote in the Upcoming Elections: September Primary and November General Election

    Get ready to vote in the upcoming elections. There is a New York state and local primary on Thursday, September 13 from noon to 9 p.m. and there is a general election for federal, state, and local offices on Tuesday, November 6.

    You still have time to register to vote for the primary – the deadline is August 19.

    The deadline to register to vote for the November general election is October 12.

    There’s a great Web site you can use to find out if you are registered to vote, where you vote, the candidates for which you will be voting (sample ballots are not yet available, but will be soon), to change your voting information (e.g., change your address if you’ve moved), and to request an absentee ballot. Here’s the link:
    https://www.monroecounty.gov/etc/voter/

    How to Register to Vote

    If you need to register to vote, you can use the link, https://www.monroecounty.gov/etc/voter/ and then click on the tab, “Register to Vote.” You will be taken to copy of the voter registration form that you can fill out and mail in. If you are registering in Monroe County, the mailing address is Monroe County Board of Elections, 39 Main St. W., Rochester, NY 14614. Mailing addresses for the Boards of Elections in other counties are on the form itself.

    A Spanish version of the voter registration form can be found at:
    https://www2.monroecounty.gov/files/MonroeCounty-Mail-Spanish-2015.pdf

    You can also call the Monroe County Board of Elections at 585-753-1550 to request a voter registration form be mailed to you.

    You can even register online at the New York state Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) Web site, if you have a New York driver’s license, learner’s permit, or a non-driver identification card. Here’s the link to use:
    https://dmv.ny.gov/more-info/electronic-voter-registration-application

    Eligibility to Vote

    You must be a United States citizen to register to vote.

    The minimum age for voting is 18 at the time of the election, so you may register if you are not yet 18 but will turn 18 before the election in which you wish to vote. So, for example, if you want to vote in the primary on September 13, you can register even if you’re only 17 as long as you will turn 18 by September 13. Similarly, you may register for the general election even if you’re now 17 as long as you will turn 18 by November 6. You do, of course, have to register by the appropriate registration deadlines specified above.

    If you are convicted felon, you are eligible to register to vote once you have completed your sentence including probation.

    Who is on the Ballot in the Upcoming State and Local Primary?

    At the state level, there is a two-way primary for the Democratic nomination for the office of Governor. The candidates (in alphabetical order) are the incumbent, Andrew Cuomo, and Cynthia Nixon.

    There is also four-way primary for Attorney General. The candidates are Leecia Eve, Tish James, Sean Patrick Maloney, and Zephyr Teachout.

    At the local level, primary candidates will vary depending on where you live. You can use the https://www.monroecounty.gov/etc/voter/ link to check your ballot as the date of the state and local primary (September 13) grows near.

    Where can I get Information about the Candidates?

    Most candidates have Web sites where you can learn more about them. Do an Internet search using the candidate’s name to find their Web site.

    In addition, a number of non-partisan groups offer candidate information. Examples are:
    • The League of Women Voters – New York state: http://lwvny.org/
    • The League of Women Voters (Rochester chapter): http://www.lwv-rma.org/
    • Ballotpedia, an encyclopedia of American politics and elections: http://www.ballotpedia.org/