• Democrats Elected to Office on Nov. 5: A Complete List

    County-wide, we unseated Republican incumbents in the County Executive and County Court Judges races and we claimed an open County Court Judge seat.

    Monroe County Executive: Adam Bello

    Monroe County Court Judges: Karen Bailey Turner and Michael Dollinger

    Democrats now hold 14 of 29 seats on the County Legislature. John Baynes beat the Republican incumbent in the 18th district, Michael Yudelson picked up a seat in the 13th district and Yversha Roman in the 26th district.

    County Legislature 10th: Howard Maffucci
    County Legislature 13th: Michael Yudelson
    County Legislature 14th: Justin Wilcox
    County Legislature 17th: Joe Morelle Jr.
    County Legislature 18th: John Baynes
    County Legislature 21st: Rachel Barnhart
    County Legislature 22nd: Vincent R. Felder
    County Legislature 23rd: Linda M. Hasman
    County Legislature 24th: Joshua Bauroth
    County Legislature 25th: John Lightfoot
    County Legislature 26th: Yversha Roman
    County Legislature 27th: Sabrina LaMar
    County Legislature 28th: Frank Keophetlasy
    County Legislature 29th: Ernest S. Flagler-Mitchell

    In the City of Rochester, Democrats won all four city council seats, all four seats on the school board, and both city court judgeships.

    Rochester City Council East: Mary Lupien
    Rochester City Council Northeast: Michael Patterson
    Rochester City Council Northwest: Jose Peo
    Rochester City Council South: LaShay Harris
    Rochester City School Board: Ricardo Adams, Beatriz LeBron, Amy Maloy, and Willa Powell
    Rochester City Court: Melissa Barrett and Nicole Morris

    In the Town of Brighton, all of the Democratic incumbents were re-elected.
    Brighton Town Supervisor: Bill Moehle
    Town Clerk: Dan Aman
    Town Board Members: Christopher Werner, Christine E. Corrado and Jason DiPonzio
    Town Justice: Karen Morris

    The Town of Henrietta’s Democratic incumbent supervisor was re-elected, two Democrats defeated two Republican incumbents for town justice positions, and a Democrat won one of two seats for town council. 
    Henrietta Town Supervisor: Steve Schultz
    Town Justices: Bob Cook and Sue Michel
    Town Council: Member Millie Sefranek

    In the Town of Irondequoit, the Democratic incumbent was re-elected to supervisor as was the incumbent town justice, and Democrats won two seats on the town council, defeating two Republican opponents.
    Irondequoit Town Supervisor: David A. Seeley
    Town Board Members: Patrina Freeman and John Perticone
    Town Justice: Pat Russi

    In the Town of Perinton, Democrats won a seat on the town council.
    Town Council: Mere Stockman-Broadbent

    A Democratic candidate in the Town of Pittsford won a seat on the town council.
    Town Council: Cathleen A. Koshykar

    The Democratic candidate in the Town of Rush defeated the Republican for supervisor, and a Democrat won a seat on the town council.
    Town Supervisor: Gerry Kusse
    Town Council: Amber Corbin

    In the Town of Webster, the Republican incumbent was defeated by his Democratic challenger.
    Town Supervisor: Tom Flaherty

    Democratic candidates in the Village of Fairport beat their two Republican opponents for village trustee.

    Trustee: Emily Mischler
    Trustee: Michael Folino 

  • You Did It!

    Friends,

    Yesterday Monroe Democrats made history. For the first time in 32 years the County Executive seat is blue. We elected the first African American woman to County Court Judge. We picked up seats in the County Legislature, electing the first Asian American and Latina to serve.

    We flipped Webster and Rush blue, and made Democratic gains in town board seats. None of this would have been possible without you. 

    Thanks to our grassroots supporters and Chairs Club members, the committee has the resources it needs to support our Democratic candidates and voters. Thanks to our Democratic allies in government and activism, we share a vision for the county toward which we made substantial progress.

    Last but far from least, none of this would have been possible without the unstoppable army of volunteers who sacrificed countless hours, and then some, for our incredible candidates across the board.

    This is what democracy looks like. Thank you. 

    I am so proud of ALL of our candidates, the Monroe County Democratic Committee’s (MCDC) largest slate in history, who delivered a powerful message of hope and promise for the future of our region. As Democrats, we all proved that the only way we can make change in Monroe County is by devoting ourselves to the cause as a united front. 

    Again, thank you for standing with Team MCDC. We are looking forward to keeping the momentum going and continuing to make history for Democrats in 2020. 

    Sincerely,

    Brittaney M. Wells

    Chairwoman

  • It’s Time to Vote: Important Information for Voting on Tuesday, Nov. 5, in Local and County Races

    It’s time to vote in the general election for local and county offices on Tuesday, November 5. Polls are open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

    Don’t Know if You’re Registered to Vote or Where to Vote?

    Use Monroe County’s Online Voter site to find out if you are registered to vote, where you vote, the candidates for which you will be voting (sample ballots are not yet available, but will be soon), to change your voting information (e.g., change your address if you’ve moved), and to request an absentee ballot.

    Another great resource is Everything You Need to Know to Vote.

    Who are the Democrats on the Ballot?

    There are many local races this year, so who’s on your ballot is going to vary depending on where you live. There are many races at the community level as well as at the county level, including County Supervisor. Use the Monroe County Online Voter site to see a sample ballot for your community.

    The Monroe County Board of Elections has a complete list of all candidates running in Monroe County in all parties for any elected office.

    Where can I get Information about the Candidates?

    Most candidates have Web sites where you can learn more about them. Do an Internet search using the candidate’s name to find their Web site.

    In addition, a number of non-partisan groups offer candidate information. Examples are:
    The League of Women Voters – New York state
    The League of Women Voters (Rochester chapter)
    Ballotpedia, an encyclopedia of American politics and elections

  • Special County Committee Meeting for BOE Commissioner

    County Committee Members:

    We will hold our Special County Committee Meeting on Thursday, August 8th, 2019 at Workers United, 750 East Ave., Rochester, NY.

    The meeting will be called to order at 6:00pm and credentialing will begin at 5:00pm for committee members. Please allow yourself enough time to sign in.

    The meeting is being held to elect our next Commissioner of the Board of Elections. If you have any questions about the committee meeting, please contact Briana Scott at 585.232.2410.

    PROXY: Please print and complete the form below if you cannot attend the county committee meeting on August 8th. Proxy’s can be carried by a registered democrat but only one proxy per person.

  • Stonewall: A Beacon of Hope Fifty Years Later

    By: Owen Boice (MCDC 2019 Summer Intern) 

     

    Some events shape the history of civil rights. Stonewall is one of them.

    On June 28, 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn—a safe-haven for LGBTQ+ New Yorkers, located in Lower Manhattan’s Greenwich Village neighborhood—and attacked gay patrons. This event, alone, would not change the landscape of the fight for LGBTQ+ rights.

    What followed, however, did.

    For the next six days following the raid, riots broke out within the gay community. The abuse, harassment, and discrimination toward LGBTQ+ New Yorkers had reached a critical mass, leading to a turning point in the fight for LGBTQ+ rights.

    The community formed groups such as the Gay Liberation Front, Lamda Legal, and Human Rights Campaign, among others, began advocating for LGBTQ+ rights. In addition to formal organization, Stonewall also brought the existence of the LGBTQ+ community into the public’s consciousness.

    In the Greater-Rochester area, the Democrat and Chronicle published a four-part segment on the gay community in 1964—four years before Stonewall. The Rochester Gay Liberation Front facilitated a social event in 1971 to raise awareness about the gay community. The Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley formed in 1973, and by 1989, a parade was added to the annual pride activities in Rochester.

    Even though the LGBTQ+ community still faces pervasive challenges today, Stonewall and its aftermath have been the impetus for a number of reforms. For instance, discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community was perfectly legal until 2003 when New York State passed an act prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation. In addition, New York State laws also prohibited same-sex relationships until 1980 when the New York State Court of Appeals abolished the law. Gay couples were unable to marry until July 24, 2011 when New York State became one of the first states to enact marriage equality after Gov. Cuomo signed the legislation a month prior.

    While the memory of Stonewall remains a beacon of hope for the LGBTQ+ community, it also speaks to New York State and Monroe County’s commitment to a more equitable society. This June, the LGBTQ+ community celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of Stonewall—for the watershed moment it was and the civil rights movement it represents. Rochester commemorates the 50th anniversary this week (July 13th- 21st) as we stand in solidarity with our LGBTQ+ community!

  • 2019 Primary Election Results

    With paper still to count, our Democratic party-endorsed county court candidates, Michael Dollinger, and Karen Bailey Turner have emerged from hotly contested, third-party races and secured the Independence Party and Working Families Party lines, respectively, for November’s general election. Dollinger and Bailey Turner’s stellar performance in June is a bellwether for countywide success this fall!

    LaShay Harris earned over 60% of the vote in her bid to be kept on for Rochester City Council – South District. 

    Michael Patterson nearly doubled his opponent’s tally in his successful reelection campaign for Rochester City Council – Northeast District. 

    Amy Maloy succeeded in her first campaign to win a seat as commissioner of Rochester City Schools against a broad, diverse field of activists. 

    Hon. Melissa Barrett set herself apart from a strong field of city court candidates to retain her position on the bench. She is joined by Nicole Morris, an experienced and passionate assistant public defender.

    Michael Yudelson, former Henrietta town supervisor, earned the Democratic party designation in his bid for County Legislator for the 13th District, a crucial swing seat currently under Republican control. 

    Joseph Morelle Jr. roundly defeated his opponent in an open primary for the Independence Party line in the 17th county legislature district. 

    John Baynes, lifelong Democrat, has parlayed an ambitious gambit for County Legislator – 18th District, a seat friends of Cheryl Dinolfo has long kept warm for friends, into a one-vote lead in a write-in campaign for the Independence Party line. 

    In a closely watched race for the 21st County Legislative district seat, Rachel Barnhart, former journalist and student of government, claimed victory. 

    Linda Hasman won convincingly in a three-person field in her race for the Democratic designation for County Legislator – 23rd District, assuring herself victory in November’s general election. 

    Long-standing community leader John Lightfoot held off a challenge to his 25th County Legislative seat. 

    Yversha Roman weathered a rough race in the 26th Legislative District and beat an incumbent, the only such feat in Monroe County’s 2019 primaries. Roman moves forward to a key race in our effort to take control of the county legislature. 

    Sabrina LaMar, an anti-gun violence activist and sitting County Legislator for the 27th District, bested her opponent and will retain her seat following November’s uncontested general election. 

    Tom Flaherty’s first entry into electoral politics was an impressive one, as he secured a resounding victory in his race to become the Democratic nominee for Webster Town Supervisor

    Congratulations to the Town Supervisor candidate, Gerry Kusse, and town council candidates in Rush, Chaz Rorick, and Amber Corbin, who upset the nominally endorsed Republicans for the Independence Party line. Their write-in campaign was one of the few successful ones in the entire county—but certainly combined to help the top of the ticket. 

  • Get Out The Vote! Primary Election Day, June 25th.

    Election Day is Tuesday, June 25th, and here is all you need to know to effectively cast your vote in this important election.  Polls open at 12 PM and close at 9 PM. Details such as who is on the ballot, and where to find more information can be found on our Who We Are page.

    Additionally, if you have any remaining questions, please call our Get Out The Vote (GOTV) hotline at (585) 434-1620 for questions, court orders or if you need a ride to your polling place.  Remember that if you are rejected at your polling place, you have the right to request a provisional ballot and a receipt for it. This is protected by Federal law. Your vote is important!

    If you’re wondering what you can do to help before election day, we are still looking for volunteers through Tuesday to canvass neighborhoods and phone bank for our candidates. Please sign up via our volunteer form

    To access the voter registration forms to prepare for the general election click here.

    Who are the Democrats on the Primary Ballot?

    (D: Democratic Primary, I: Independence Primary, WFP: Working Families Primary)

    County-Wide

    Adam Bello: County Executive (I)

    Michael Dollinger: County Court Judge (I, WFP)

    Karen Bailey Turner: County Court Judge (I, WFP)

    County Legislature

    Karen Lobracco: County Legislature- District 2 (WFP)

    Marvin Stepherson: County Legislature- District 3 (WFP)

    Josh Mack: County Legislature- District 4 (WFP)

    Terry Daniele: County Legislature- District 5 (I, WFP)

    Dan J. Maloney: County Legislature- District 6 (I)

    Jim Leary: County Legislature- District 7 (WFP)

    Megan Thompson: County Legislature- District 8 (I)

    Catherine Dean: County Legislature- District 9 (I)

    Joshua Foladare: County Legislature- District 11 (I, WFP)

    Michael Yudelson: County Legislature- District 13 (D, I, WFP)

    Carl “Butch” Fitzsimmons: County Legislature- District 15 (I, WFP)

    Lorie Barnum: County Legislature- District 16 (WFP)

    Joe Morelle Jr.: County Legislature- District 17 (WFP)

    John Baynes: County Legislature- District 18 (I, WFP)

    JW Cook: County Legislature- District 20 (I)

    Victor Sanchez: County Legislature- District 21 (D)

    Linda Hasman: County Legislature- District 23 (D)

    John Lightfoot: County Legislature- District 25 (D)

    Yversha Roman: County Legislature- District 26 (D, WFP)

    Sabrina LaMar: County Legislature- District 27 (D)

    City-Wide

    Hon. Melissa Barrett- Rochester City Court (D)

    Mark Muoio- Rochester City Court (D)

    LaShay Harris: City Council- South District (D)

    LaShana Boose: City Council- Northwest District (D)

    Mary Lupien: City Council- East District (D)

    Michael Patterson: City Council- Northeast District (D)

    Judith Davis: RCSD Commissioner (D)

    Howard Eagle: RCSD Commissioner (D)

    Amy Maloy: RCSD Commissioner (D)

    Anthony Hall: RCSD Commissioner (D)

    Towns:

    Tom Flaherty: Webster Town Supervisor (D)

  • Elect Linda Hasman for County Legislature

    As MCDC’s designated candidate for County Legislator for the 23rd District, Linda Hasman aims to prioritize Monroe County families and our most vulnerable citizens by addressing issues with Child Protective Services (CPS), Early Intervention Services, Child Care Subsidies. She also addresses the opioid epidemic, climate change, the LBGTQ community and the well-being of our elderly. Linda also endorsed by NYSUT Rochester, and 1199 SEIU

    Originally from Oswego, NY, and relocating to the Rochester-Area in 2006, Linda has worked as a medical librarian at the University at Buffalo and currently works at the University of Rochester Medical Center as the Assistant Director for Research and Clinical Information at Miner Library. She has been involved in research teams, patient care teams, community health projects and helping patients and families access quality, reliable health information. In Addition, Linda is currently working on a Master’s in Public Health at the U of R.

    Linda aims to tackle Monroe County’s Child Protective Services’ staff shortages, excessive caseloads, and high turnover; early intervention services needed for children with disabilities and child care subsidies. She is also prioritizing the alarming opioid epidemic as she believes Monroe County should adopt multi-modal, evidence-based approaches that bring together various stakeholders in the community from health care providers, public health experts, family members, and local governments. Additionally, Linda plans to offer targeted tax breaks for solar panels, insulation, and modernizing windows to combat rapid climate change, improve public transportation, increase the number of bicycle lanes, community composting, and increasing green spaces.

    Furthermore, in alliance with the LGBTQ community, Linda supports building coalitions of community stakeholders to reduce the burden of health disparities, homelessness affecting our LGBTQ youth. Lastly, Linda aims to bring together health care providers, seniors, government officials, and other key stakeholders to identify a way to implement housing and transportation innovations that could benefit senior citizens.

    Vote for Linda Hasman for County Legislator on June 25th

  • Elect Yversha Roman for County Legislator

    Yversha Roman is the designated candidate for County Legislator for the 26th Legislative District and the current 26 LD Democratic Committee Leader– advocating to ensure our fair share of county services regarding roads and infrastructure repairs and a transparent government. Furthermore, Yversha is standing up for the future by seeking child care subsidies and working alongside school districts representatives, and City and town boards to find ways to streamline services and provide the best opportunities for young people. 

    Relocating to the Greater-Rochester Area from Ponce, Puerto Rico at the age of 4, Yversha Roman describes her upbringing as “living in two worlds” as she became deeply rooted in her community juxtaposed to her Catholic school education– having the opportunity to attend The Aquinas Institute and Nazareth College, obtaining a B.S. in Social Work.  By the age of 13, Yversha became a pioneer worked alongside Father Tracey in starting a youth group within her church, St. Michael’s. At the age of 15, Yversha began working as a community outreach advocate with Action for a Better Community’s Action Front Center. She spent five years working as a peer educator in the field of HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention.

    Yversha is currently the Senior Relationship Manager and Latino Leadership Development Coordinator for the United Way of Greater Rochester, helping to provide critical funding to over 70 programs throughout Monroe County, touching the lives of over 30,000 residents. She previously served two years as a mentor and student support specialist at East High school through The Center for Youth Services (CFY), Inc and spent an additional year at East working with the Rochester After School Program. Later, working at Monroe High school as Program Manager for the Center for Youth After School Program. Yversha was later promoted to Assistant Director of School-Based Programs at CFY, helping to train employees and provided oversight for programs such as Rochester Teen Court and New Beginnings School.

    Yversha is endorsed by WEPac, where she is a current facilitator of the program providing women with a safety net of support and the experience to feel comfortable to run for office. In the recent past, she was recognized by the Democrat and Chronicle “Women to Watch”, the Hispanic Coalition of New York State, Inc “40 under 40” and City Newspaper’s “Rochester Ten”, for her community service.

    Vote on June 25th for Yversha Roman for County Legislator.

  • Re-elect Michael Patterson for City Council- Northeast District

    Council member Michael Patterson is the incumbent and designated democratic candidate for City Council’s Northeast District. Originally appointed to the seat on December 17, 2013, Michael serves the council as the Chair of the Neighborhood and Business Development Committee and as a member of the Finance Committee and Arts and Culture committee.


    Prior to his appointment, Councilman Patterson served as the County Legislator for the 29th District. He is also a past member of Metro Justice Council, a progressive member-driven, grassroots organization dedicated to social, economic, and racial justice in Rochester, serving as the Social Action Chair. “I love the work and the opportunity to build this neighborhood and help and support my neighbors,” Patterson told Spectrum News on June 2nd. “That’s what it’s all about. It’s not about me it’s about the community.”

    Additionally, Councilman Patterson is credited for bringing the Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America (NACA),  the largest non-profit homeownership and community advocacy organization certified by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, to the Greater-Rochester area. “I start with housing for a very simple reason: if you don’t have a decent affordable place to live and to lay your head, you have got nothing.”

    Re-elect Michael Patterson for City Council- East District on June 25th.

  • Re-Elect John Lightfoot for County Legislature 25

    The Honorable John Lightfoot, incumbent candidate for the Monroe County Legislature for the 25th District and prides himself on “working for the people” since being elected into office in 2012. He serves as Ranking Minority Member of the Transportation Committee and is the Assistant Minority Leader of the Monroe County Democrats.

    Legislator Lightfoot passed legislation that increased the participation of Minority and Woman Business Enterprises (MWBEs) by raising the minimum participation requirements, and was an active participant in the relocation of Monroe Community College– Damon Campus in downtown Rochester and advocated for MCC remaining in the 25th District.

    Additionally, Legislator Lightfoot previously served as Rochester City Councilmember At-Large from 2006 to 2010 and during his tenure, Lightfoot championed the Jefferson Avenue Revitalization Project with over $3.8 million of federal, state and local resources, after which he received the Jefferson Avenue Business Association “Commitment Award.”

    Prior to becoming an election official, Legislator Lightfoot has committed over 15 years to community service, serving as President of Changing of the Scenes Neighborhood Association and as Co-Chair of the Southwest Common Council. In addition, he earned his Masters in Public Administration and Nonprofit Administration, with honors, from the College of Brockport while in office.

  • Keep LaShay Harris for City Council- South District

    Council member LaShay Harris was recently appointed to City Council on April 30th due to a unanimous vote, solidifying the trust and confidence of the community. Prior to her appointment, Harris completed a full term as County Legislator for the 27th District being the second African-American Woman to serve on county government– the first was the late-great Constance Mitchell. She will continue to be a strong advocate for city residents and support a fiscally responsible government, strong neighborhoods and thriving small businesses, and continuous economic growth.

    Councilwoman Harris began her career in EMS for the National Ambulance, Rural/Metro’s predecessor, as an EMT, eventually becoming a paramedic in 1997 after graduating from the Western New York Emergency Medical Services Training Institute. She previously served as a Paramedic Preceptor, CPR Instructor, and continues as an Educator. In 2003, she took a full-time position at Irondequoit Ambulance as a Paramedic, later promoted to Deputy Operations Manager where she served until her 2008 appointment as the Public Information Officer (PIO) of Rural/Metro Medical Services, Rochester, NY. During her time as the PIO, LaShay developed a robust and responsive Media Incident Alert Program instrumental in forming a partnership with the local media agencies.

    LaShay has been instrumental as an instructor coordinator for the EMS Pathway of the Career Pathways to Public Safety Program and initiated the implementation of EMT training at REOC of the College at Brockport. These programs involve key partnerships with the City of Rochester, Rochester City Schools District and the College at Brockport.

    Vote 10A on June 25th for LaShay Harris for City Council- South District.

  • Elect Mary Lupien for City Council- East District

    As a mother, community activist, city school teacher, Mary Lupien will continue to fight for the protection of renters’ rights, police accountability, the expansion of public transportation and creating a more green and sustainable future as your Councilwoman for the East District.

    “Mary’s dedication to her community, through her work with the Citywide Tenant Union, and as a bilingual city school teacher, is emblematic of our ideals and of the greater fight against inequality in our communities,” said Jesse Lenney, State Committee Member for Working Families Party in regards to Mary receiving their endorsement. Mary was also endorsed by 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East Labor Union.

    Mary is fighting for a thriving, livable city where all residents have stable, quality and affordable homes, police accountable by the communities they serve, and where walkable, bikeable streets and fantastic public transportation connects us to our work, schools, and families while creating a more sustainable future. Additionally, Mary aims to earn the trust of the community, partners, and fellow activists to carry forward the shared vision of a better Rochester for All.

    Mary is a board member of the Beechwood Coalition, and a volunteer with the City Roots Land Trust and City-Wide Tenant Union, which aims to prevent displacement of neighbors due to the effects of Gentrification by creating opportunities for stable, affordable housing. In addition, Mary is the organizer with Mothers Out Front, a group mobilizing to preserve a livable climate for our children.


  • Elect Mark Muoio for City Court

    Experience, Justice, and Compassion are what Monroe County designated candidate Mark Muoio for City Court is promising once elected into office. As the current Monroe County Legislature for District 21–representing the North Winton Village, Beechwood and Bensonhurst neighborhoods, and Director of Housing and Consumer Law Unit at The Legal Aid Society of Rochester, Muoio has proven his commitment to the City of Rochester and assisted in his legal knowledge needed to be a City Court Judge. Additionally, Muoio has represented more than 4,000 persons in the Rochester City Court in the past decade.

    In the last 18 months, Mark has worked with the Mayor’s Office, members of Rochester City Council, local judges, and others to bring immediate reforms to civil court and provide a vision of what a more just civil court would look like, such as having a single judge sitting in a dedicated Housing Court and allowing tenants a streamlined right of action to sue landlords for housing code violations.

    As a Legislator, Muoio advocates for more ethical and transparent County government and has worked closely with the Monroe County Department of Human Services to ensure all residents receive their entitled assistance– recently assembling a task force expert and elected officials to address the disparities in DHS sanctions. As Director of Housing and Consumer Law Unit, he fights daily to ensure affordable housing for city residents, safeguarding housing security and combating homelessness.

    Mark resides in the North Wonton Village with his wife and two young children.

    Vote on June 25th for Mark Muoio for City Court.

  • Elect LaShana Boose for City Council- NorthWest District

    LaShana Boose, a longtime resident of the Northwest Community and leader of the 28th Legislative District, is running to become our next elected member of City Council for the Northwest Quadrant. She has received labor endorsements from the Rochester Labor Council, Locust Club, Bente Local 2419, 1199 SEIU and AFSCME Local 1635. Ms. Boose vows to fight for a multi-year plan aimed to progressively bring jobs back to the Northwest District. In addition, she plans to partner with current neighborhood business owners to gain a better understanding of their concerns and ensure they are addressed.

    “Not in Our Backyard!” is the motto LaShana adopted as she plans to partner with local police precincts to build better relationships between the community and law enforcement. She also plans to examine basic environmental factors that can assist with crime reduction and add more street and spotlights.

    In May 2018, LaShana was named Democrat and Chronicle’s Women to Watch and in 2017 she became the Emerging Leader of the American Association of University Women Greater Rochester Branch. Additionally, she is a 2014 graduate of the United Way of Greater Rochester African American Leadership Development program. Lastly, LaShana is an Alumna of SUNY at Buffalo, obtaining a BA in Social Science Interdisciplinary and an MA in Public Policy from Regents University.

    LaShana has a lengthy digest of civic engagement ranging from serving on the Zoning Board of Appeals for the City of Rochester to being a Daisy Troop Leader for the Girl Scouts of Western New York.

    LaShana is a proud wife to her husband James and they have three children.

    Vote 12A for LaShana Boose for City Council on June 25th!  

  • Vote Tom Flaherty for Webster Town Supervisor

    A Webster resident since October 1997, Tom Flaherty vows to bring a fresh perspective and purpose-driven change as the endorsed Democrat candidate for Webster Town Supervisor.

    Mr. Flaherty believes the Town Supervisor should be a caretaker of the people and overall fiscally responsible and wants the best for ALL Webster residents. Tom proclaims true leadership is not partisan but rather pragmatic.

    Tom graduated from St. Bonaventure University in 1987 and obtained his CPA designation in 1991. He later founded FFC Mortage (originally Flaherty Funding Corp.) in 1995 that ran until January 2019, employing over 100 local individuals throughout the years and sponsored several local charities, events, and organizations.

    Mr. Flaherty has served on countless Boards and committees including Bishop Kearney High School, School of the Holy Childhood, Webster Youth Hockey, St. Rita Parish Finance and has been an active volunteer in the Big Brother/Little Brother program. Additionally, he has coached a number of teams for WAA Baseball and Webster Youth Hockey

    He was named an esteemed RBJ 40-under-40 and the Irish Parade Committee’s Irish Businessman of the Year.

    Tom has been married to his wife for over 22 years and have 7 children ranging from the ages of 11-22.

    Vote Tom Flaherty for Webster Town Supervisor in the Democratic Primary on June 25th.

  • Elect Michael Yudelson for County Legislature

    Michael Yudelson is MCDC’s designated candidate for Monroe County Legislature-District 13 and is former Henrietta Town Supervisor, proudly declaring no tax raises under his 6-year leadership. Overall, Yudelson vows to be “an independent voice to advocate for the interests of the residents of [his] district and the entire Monroe County community”. He currently serves as the leader for the Henrietta Democratic Committee.

    Hailing from a family of public service, Michael has a long history of volunteering in the Henrietta community. As the founding member of the Rush-Henrietta Education Foundation, former president of the Winslow Parent-Teacher Association and past Director of the Department of Recreation and Youth Bureau, Yudelson doubles down on his efforts to restore vital services to protect vulnerable youth. As a result, he was selected Henrietta’s “Citizen of the Year” in 1993, “Volunteer of the Year” by Rush-Henrietta in 2001, and was awarded the “Distinguished Citizen” award by the Henrietta Elks Lodge in 2005.

    He was also the recipient of the Martin Luther King Humanitarian Award and Most Dedicated Youth Leader in Henrietta Post Reader’s poll.

    Vote for Michael Yudelson for County Legislature District 13 on June 25th.

  • Keep Sabrina LaMar for County Legislature- 27th District

    The Honorable Sabrina LaMar represents the 27th District in the Monroe County Legislature after being appointed to the seat on May 14th, serving on the Legislature’s Public Safety and Human Services Committees.

    Ms. LaMar is an advocate for “development without displacement” and her vision is that residents become the beneficiaries of their community’s economic growth.

    Sabrina is also committed to the City of Rochester is reflective of her personal and professional activities: She is the Assistant Director for an all-volunteer based, Rise UP Rochester, whose mission is to establish and maintain a non-violent culture while providing support to families of homicide victims. A recognized leader in the community of advocates, she works alongside community partners in developing and implementing programs that affect change.

    Ms. LaMar currently works as Project Coordinator for the Community Engagement to Reduce Victimization (CERV) project at RIT’s Center for Public Safety Initiatives in the Criminal Justice Department. She also chairs the education committee of the ROC Against Gun Violence Coalition.

    LaMar is also a member of the 19th Ward Association, Baber AME Church, the Black Excellence/Juneteenth Planning Committee, and Roc The Peace.

    Vote 2A on June 25th to keep Sabrina LaMar as your County Legislature for the 27th District.

  • Victor Sanchez for County Legislature- 21 District

    Victor Sanchez was born in Atlixco Puebla, a small city in Mexico and moved to the United States at the age of 6. After many years living as a legal resident, Victor felt the urgency to obtain his citizenship after the 2016 presidential election– not only because of what it could mean for his future (At a time where immigrants are being attacked at a federal level), but to secure his vote and voice for his community and country representation.

    A graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology with a Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering Technology and currently employed at Wegmans Foods Market in its Development Group as a Building Information Modeling Coordinator, Sanchez has become embedded in the Rochester community since 2006 and is committed to several issues such as–but not limited to: the expansion of job training programs, increasing affordable housing, and strengthening minority ownership and hiring requirements for all county projects .

    Actively involved in the community; Victor currently is the Co-Chair of RocCity Coalition an organization with the objective to attract, retain, and empower young professionals in the greater Rochester area. He represents the Coalition in the Governor’s Regional Economic Council and the Roc The Riverway Management Entity Advisory Committee. He also focuses on goals to improve public transportation access through his work on the Reimagine RTS advisory committee and other transit organizations.

    Sanchez also works on increasing neighborhood stability and the quality of life through working with the Vacant and Abandoned Property Task Force led by County Clerk Adam Bello.

    As a gay person of color, Victor knows how important it is to reach out to members of the LGBTQ+ community who have often been marginalized. With this in mind, he worked to assist the Out Alliance with projects that seek to provide individuals with greater access to health and mental health services. Additionally, he is an active volunteer with the Human Rights Campaign of Western NY working to help support the organization’s mission to gain equal rights and protections for LGBTQ+ individuals. He also serves on the Board of Directors at Trillium Health, a health center that specializes in LGBTQ+ health care and supporting those living with HIV.

    Vote June 25th for Victor Sanchez for County Legislature- District 21!

  • Keep Judge Melissa Barrett

    The Honorable Melissa Barrett aims to provide fairness, respect, and dignity to the Rochester City Court, proving why she earned the Monroe County Democratic Committee’s endorsement. Prior to her appointment in December 2018, Judge Melissa Barrett was a Principal Court Attorney for nearly 15 years and an Assistant Monroe County Public Defender for four years in Rochester City Court.

    The married, mother of two teens currently serves on several Seventh Judicial District Committees including the Administrative Judge Training Task Force, Mentoring Program, Workforce Diversity Committee, and Employee Interviewing Panels.  Her committee work has allowed her to advance the Access to Justice Initiative in Monroe County by going out to community agencies and educating the public on the New York State Court Access to Justice Program.

    Additionally,  Judge Barrett is active with the Rochester Black Bar Association JustLaw Program and the President of the Deaconess Ministry at Aenon Missionary Baptist Church and a parent volunteer for the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Science Technology Entry Program (STEP).  Judge Barrett holds a Juris Doctor from the University at Buffalo School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts from the State University of New York at Albany. She is also a 2005 graduate of the United Way of Rochester African American Leadership Development Program

    Judge Barrett is the recipient of numerous awards including: City of Rochester, Department of Recreation and Youth Services Volunteer Award, The Daily Record Leaders In Law Award, Women in the Law Award, Alpha Kappa Alpha Trailblazer for Justice Award, Certificate of Appreciation – 7th JD Administrative Judge Task Force, Rochester Business Journal Forty Under 40 Award, Rochester Teen Court Volunteer Award, and The Daily Record Up and Coming Attorneys Award.

    To keep Judge Melissa Barrett in Rochester City Court vote 7A on June 25th!

  • To “I” or Not to “I”, That is the Question that Will Not Separate Democrats.

    Photo: Getty Images

    A Case for Drafting Articles of Impeachment

    By: Lottie Gonzalez-Habes

    Two distinct inclinations appear to separate Democrats across Monroe County just like throughout the nation after the release of Robert Mueller’s report.  The much-awaited document laid out many instances of evidence demonstrating that Donald Trump engaged in acts to obstruct justice and more disturbingly, attempted to hide and obscure similar actions using and pressuring aides and advisors.  The questions posed by the talking heads on television, as well as, print and social media have changed from: When will the duly elected Congress be “allowed” to read the un-redacted text of the investigation conducted by Mueller? to: What will the duly elected Democrats do with the results of the report? The narrative has morphed to suggest or predict a splintering democratic unity.  However, as true blue democrats, the writers of this article announce that much to the chagrin and irritation of Republicans, we don’t agree with that divisive premise.  We each see the Democratic Party as the big tent institution in which diverse opinions and analysis can be debated and considered without fear of retribution. The varied principles of pursuing social justice,  fighting against economic inequality, defense of the environment and defense of Democracy prove that voters are united by more than one issue.

    The Mueller report lists clear findings in support, at minimum, of drafting articles of impeachment and recording the action for the benefit of future generations of voters to come.  These facts are substantiated in the 2nd volume of the report: a) President’s conduct toward Flynn and his questionable Russian connections, b) President asking for Comey’s loyalty and to let go of Flynn’s investigative effort, C) Unsuccessful Efforts to fire Mueller, d) Efforts to force Sessions to un-recuse himself and take over the investigation, e) Orders given to Don McGhan ( White House Counsel) to fire or pressure others in the administration, f) Statements in favor of Manafort, lamenting legal process against his convicted campaign manager and g) Actions to prevent disclosure of Trump Tower meeting with Russian operatives, to mention only six of many contained in his report.

    The report also reveals the Special Counsel’s quiet disagreement with the premise that a seating president cannot be indicted. Granted, the numerical reality is also clear.  There is a lack of enough principled Republicans in the Senate; who would vote “Yes” to denounce and record their outrage for  Donald Trump’s unethical, corrupt and unpatriotic actions. Republicans will not show a spine to achieve removal from office.

    Regardless, this Democrat believes that defending America’s style of democratic government is worth the effort. It is imperative that we teach future candidates, like Trump, that Americans of diverse political views, will never overlook and will not give a pass to the public or veiled attempts of decimating democratic institutions. It is indeed worthwhile to at minimum draft articles of impeachment, and to introduce those articles into history’s record.  Democrats, in the 2020 election cycle will not only have the opportunity of winning seats in Congress with hard-fought senatorial and house of representatives campaigns. We will have the ability to win the White House, plus additional seats in Congress because that power will come from voters, tired of the dishonesty and corruption in plain view at the Trump White House. Whether voters come from rural districts in the heartland, the rust belt, or the big urban centers in the east or west coasts; they all want to elect principled leadership for the country.

    The United States wants to elect leaders who commit to legislating in favor of American families, our economy, leaders who want to protect the environment and leaders who have public safety in mind. Where our candidates stand on the “bread and butter” issues is a priority, but just as important is the priority, to support leaders committed to returning respect to the presidency, and those who defend the idea of shared government responsibilities among the three equal branches of government.  Americans will reject Trump’s authoritarian attempts at the ballot box. More importantly, American citizens will not be kind to those who ran for cover and did little to reject Trump’s damaging administrative policies and his executive and moral deficits.

    “Not Worth It,” A Case for Not Initiating Impeachment Proceedings

    By: Briana Scott, MCDC’s Press Secretary

    “Whether it’s articles of impeachment or investigations, it’s the same obtaining of facts,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in a letter to her Democratic constituents, citing a clear divide within the Democratic party since the release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on April 18th, about deciding whether to proceed with filing the articles of impeachment would be a proposition that politically would harm the prospects of victory for Democrats in the 2020 presidential election. Pelosi continued stating, “We don’t have to go to articles of impeachment to obtain the facts, the presentation of facts.”

    House Speaker Pelosi is correct: The Democratic Party should not rush into PURSUING impeachment and should only focus on getting President Trump out of office in next year’s election. Filing articles of impeachment will only further divisiveness within the party and even nationally, possibly costing the Democrats a very likely electoral win. Wasting time and energy on impeachment proceedings would not only be a mistake. It would also provoke a political implosion, especially since the Republican-controlled Senate under Mitch McConnell will not pursue the required next steps following impeachment, which is a trial in the Senate.

    Additionally, the Washington Post-Schar School conducted a poll last month and found that half of U.S. adults say the Mueller report will make no difference in which candidate they will vote for in 2020. According to Vox.com, 36 percent of voters were in favor of President Trump’s impeachment. Since the release of the Mueller report, that number dropped to 34 percent. Democrats fear if they pursue the articles of impeachment, they will not have public support, once again raising the concern of losing next year’s election. This hesitation stems from the consequences the Republican’s experienced after impeaching a President Bill Clinton, costing the party House seats in the 1998 midterm election.

    Furthermore, Democrats have at their disposal many mechanisms besides impeachment for holding President Trump accountable. Currently, House Democrats have launched investigations into Trump’s history of lying, which according to the Washington post, as of April 26th, has crossed the 10,000 lies mark; his net worth and debts on official financial documents; allegations that he made foreign policy decisions to enhance his personal wealth; and concerns that personal confidants, like Jared Kushner received security clearances despite being susceptible to foreign influences.

    2020 Presidential candidate Eric Swalwell is one of the few Democrats siding with Pelosi opposing moving forward with impeachment. He explaining on Fox News Sunday, “you only get one shot at this. I want to make sure we get it right. I think that means first getting the full Mueller report unredacted, getting Mueller to testify himself, getting people like Don McGahn in,” said Swalwell. He continued “we are winning in the courts right now. The president is outnumbered with the subpoena power and the court rulings that are on our side. I think that’s a road would go down, but we are not going to do Donald Trump justice here because we only get one shot to make sure the rule of law still stands in America.”

    Democrats must continue to investigate and unveil the wrongdoings by President Trump and the complicity of his Republican Party. And the best course of action is to continuously report their findings to the American people, remaining transparent in their course of action and continuously make strides of making Pres. Donald Trump accountable for his unprecedented actions during his administration.


  • The Monroe County Democrats submit record-breaking number of County-Wide Petitions to the Board of Elections

    The Monroe County Democratic Committee is proud to submit our county-wide petitions for the 2019 election season.

    Our county-wide designated candidates– Clerk Adam Bello for County Executive, Shani Curry-Mitchell for District Attorney and both Karen Bailey Turner and Michael Dollinger for County Court Judge persisted through harsh weather conditions to obtain an abundance of signatures to be placed on this year’s ballot.

    “Despite entering into the petitioning season earlier than expected, we are gratified by the outpouring of volunteers and supporters–resulting in approximately 12,000 county-wide signatures to place our candidates on the ballot in November,” said MCDC Chairwoman Brittaney Wells

    “Given the shortened petition period and the sometimes not so cooperative weather I am really amazed to see this many pages in the Countywide Democratic petition that was filed with the Board of Elections.  In my 20+ years here at the Board I have not seen a filing this large by Democrats in Monroe County” said Board of Election Commissioner Thomas Ferrarese.

    Hundreds of volunteers turned out to walk alongside our candidates collecting more than 7xs the required number of signatures.  Democrats are energized and voters are eager for a change to an effective and transparent county government.

  • Unbought and Unbossed

    Chair Brittaney Wells guest article in Upstate NY Gospel Magazine in celebration of Women’s History month, read full article below.

    Speaker Nancy Pelosi said it best: “Women are leaders everywhere you look ― from the CEO who runs a Fortune 500 company to the housewife who raises her children and heads her household. Our country was built by strong women, and we will continue to break down walls and defy stereotypes.”

    Last year, women across our city and our nation proved just that!

    The surprising upset of Secretary Hillary Clinton losing the 2016 election to President Trump caused women everywhere to brawl on the front lines of the resistance. From shifting the power in the House of Representatives substantially with the historic class of the 116th Congress–where 127 women took the oath of office, to the election of New York State Attorney General Leticia “Tish” James, the first African-American to serve in the position for New York State, women are taking City Halls, legislative Chambers and the Halls of Congress by storm.

    The result of the 2018 election, ultimately and satisfactorily diversified the representation of the nation. For instance, the freshman class of the 116th Congress includes the first Muslim women, first Native American women, the first black women elected from Connecticut and Massachusetts, the first Hispanic women voted in from Texas and the youngest woman to ever be elected to Congress.

    California Congresswoman Maxine Waters has proven to ‘reclaim her time’ during her tenure when citing salacious acts. Rep. Waters single-handedly ignited a fire in women and young people everywhere by telling them to “get controversial” when standing up for the everyday working individuals as well as demanding respect while proclaiming she not receive different treatment than her male counterparts. New York Congresswoman Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman to serve in Congress, routinely makes headlines for challenging the status quo of the nation’s policies including lobbying loopholes and contributions from corporations. And, let’s not forget how after regaining the position of Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic Congress refused to give into Mr.Trump’s demands for his border wall, ultimately pushing him to admit defeat and ending the government shutdown.

    After a vicious primary and ultimate defeat of becoming Georgia’s first African-American Governor– for now — Stacey Abrams is an impactful presence and role model for women across the nation. By refusing to concede to her opponent until all ballots were counted, Abrams continued to shed light that everything is not-so “peachy” with the voting discrepancies experienced in Georgia. On Tuesday, February 19th, she testified before Congress regarding the matter.

    Women in the Greater Rochester Area are also breaking barriers. Hon. Fatimat O. Reid displayed the ultimate “girl power” after winning  November’s election and becoming the first African-American woman elected to Monroe County Family Court– while expecting her fourth child. NYS Assemblywoman Jamie Romeo joined the small percentage of women in the State Assembly. Fairport, NY “turned blue” when the Village elected its first Democratic Mayor, Julie Domaratz. And the Monroe County Democrats elected its first African American Chairwoman.

    Let us not forget Rochester’s own Mayor Lovely Warren, the city’s first female Mayor. Midway through her second term, she is continuing to transform the area daily with contemporary infrastructure, the fight for quality education, job security, and incentives that primarily benefit the residents who need them most.  Additionally, Mayor Warren was featured as 100 Woke Women in Essence Magazine in 2018, stating to be woke “means to take nothing for granted, that you are a part of the change you want to see. And staying woke means to wake up and realize that no one else is going to do this for you–you have to get out there and do the work. You have to want to climb that stairway. There’s no sitting on the sidelines for this.”

    Monroe County Democratic-endorsed candidates Shani Curry-Mitchell and Karen Bailey Turner are spearheading the 2019 election season in their own right with their boastful statements of rejuvenations for the county’s judicial system. Curry-Mitchell, a Spelman College graduate, is running for Monroe County District Attorney. Bailey Turner is a Jamaican-English immigrant, running for County Court Judge making her the first African American woman to serve in the role if elected.

    Two years have passed since women were placing their “I Voted Today” stickers on Susan B. Anthony’s grave-stone, in anticipation of the first Madame President.  In the recent months, six women, including Sen. Kirstin Gillibrand, Sen Elizabeth Warren, and Sen. Kamala Harris have all placed their bid for the 2020 presidential election. All women candidates platforms undoubtingly refute the policies of the current administration.

    Shirley Chisolm, the first African-American woman to run for President once said “America is composed of all kinds of people – part of the difficulty in our nation today is due to the fact that we are not utilizing the abilities and the talents of our brown and black people and females that have something to bring to the creativity and the rejuvenation and the revitalization of this country.”

    Today’s women are mirroring these words, bursting through that glass ceiling once built to marginalize them. Now living in an age where women are demanding their voice be heard, accreditation for their abilities, while paying homage to those who have paved the way.  Women across the U.S. are letting everyone know they are unbought and unbossed.

  • Clerk Adam Bello and Mayor Warren Announce 2020 Census Jobs

    “With these jobs, local residents have an opportunity to earn a decent wage, gain valuable work experience and help us make sure our population is accurately reflected in the 2020 Census,” said Mayor Lovely A. Warren as she was accompanied by Monroe County Clerk Adam Bello and Jeff Behler, Regional Director of the New York Region Census Center, urging residents of the Greater Rochester area to  apply for temporary field positions for the upcoming 2020 census.

    “Our population determines the city of Rochester’s allotment of federal resources and political capital, which helps our residents thrive and reach their full potential. It is, therefore, critical that every one of our residents is counted so that Rochester can be the city it is destined to be,” said Mayor Warren.

    “Making sure that the Census counts every resident is crucial, as Census data is directly used to help determine where and how federal resources are deployed and also is used in decision-making by local governments and nonprofits. If you are looking for work and interested in helping to make a difference in your community, I strongly encourage you to look at local Census positions,” said County Clerk Bello.

    Both Mayor Warren and County Clerk Bello are current members of the New York State Count Commission.

    According to WHEC, the U.S Census Bureau is looking to hire approximately 2,000 people locally.

    The positions available include:

    • Recruiting assistants ($18.50 per hour) travel throughout geographic areas to visit with community-based organizations, attend promotional events and conduct other recruiting activities.
    • Office operations supervisors ($17.50 per hour) assist in the management of office functions and day-to-day activities in one or more functional areas, including payroll, personnel, recruiting, field operations and support.
    • Clerks ($13.50 per hour) perform various administrative and clerical tasks to support various functional areas, including payroll, personnel, recruiting, field operations and support.
    • Census field supervisors ($18.50 per hour) conduct fieldwork to support and conduct on-the-job training for census takers, and/or to follow-up in situations where census takers have confronted issues such as not gaining entry to restricted areas.
    • Census takers ($17.00 per hour) work in the field. Some field positions require employees to work during the day to see addresses on buildings. Other field positions require interviewing the public, so employees must be available to work when people are usually at home such as in the evening and on weekends.

    “While a Census is a national event, in order to be successful, it must be conducted at the local level,” said Director Behler. “This starts with hiring people to work in their own communities.  We look forward to working with the City of Rochester to ensure that together we provide easy and ample opportunities for local community members to apply to Census jobs.”

    According to the City of Rochester’s website, the City’s Office of Community Wealth Building will facilitate the online application process and hold open office hours during April, May, June to provide technical support to applicants. Plus, the OCWB is promoting “Workforce Wednesday’s” to assist applicants from 12:30-4:30 p.m. beginning April 4th at the Business and Community Services Center, 56 N. Fitzhugh St.

    Additionally, the OCWB will open its classroom space at 30 N. Fitzhugh St on three dates to provide service to several applicants at a time. These times and dates are: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, April 16; 10 to 2 p.m. Thursday, May 23; and 3 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 18.
    For more information on the jobs available or to apply online click here or call 1-855-JOB-2020.

  • Democrat & Chronicle Editorial:

    Race-Baiting: GOP must stop its race-baiting in Dinolfo-Bello race

    “Race-baiting is not about vision, issues or candidate qualifications. It is about fear, mistrust and us-versus-them.”

    Monroe County deserves better– that is why we, the Monroe Democrats, are in full support of Hon. Adam Bello for County Executive.

    D&C: Op-Ed:

    Race-baiting is an ugly political trick. Rather than trying to unite voters around good ideas, race-baiting seeks to further split a community by exploiting its racial divisions. Race-baiting is not about vision, issues or candidate qualifications. It is about fear, mistrust, and us-versus-them.

    This type of campaigning has no place in Monroe County politics. Yet, this year, it is front and center in the Monroe County Republican Committee playbook.

    We call on Chairman Bill Reilich and Executive Director Ian Winner to stop this shameful practice. Now.

    Over the past two weeks, the Republican Committee has issued a series of press releases that focus on the contest for Monroe County Executive. Yet, these releases are not about Republican incumbent Cheryl Dinolfo’s achievements or what she hopes to accomplish in a second term. In fact, her name is barely mentioned.

    A bizarre connection

    The first release contained just 10 words, in the form of a question for Dinolfo’s Democratic opponent, Monroe County Clerk Adam Bello.

    Click here for full story.

  • STATEMENT REGARDING THE WINNING DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES OF THE 2019 DESIGNATION CONVENTION

    The Monroe Democratic Committee (MCDC) is honored to present the 2019 designated Democratic candidates. The announcement took place at the Annual Democratic Designating Convention on Wednesday, February 13, 2019, at 6:00 PM at the Holiday Inn – Downtown Rochester. MCDC Chairwoman Brittaney Wells introduced the endorsed candidates during the celebration.

    Adam Bello won the Democratic nomination for County Executive, pursuant to the announcement of his candidacy on February 9th at the Workers United Hall. Bello currently serves as County Clerk and was the former Town Supervisor of Irondequoit. “Our community needs a government as good as its people. No matter who you are, where you live, or who you know, you deserve the very best from those who serve you,” Bello said when announcing his campaign.

    Shani Curry Mitchell won the Democratic nomination as designated candidate for Monroe County District Attorney. Mitchell is an experienced prosecutor with over thirteen years of prosecutorial experience, most recently working at the Monroe County District Attorney’s office. Prior to relocating back to her hometown, Mitchell began her career in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office prosecuting cases from illegal drug possession to homicide. “As a prosecutor, I know that I will understand this community because I’m from this community. I grew up in the Southwest of the city, graduated from Wilson Magnet High School, and went on to Spelman College in Atlanta. After achieving my law degree, I knew that we needed to balance the demand for justice with the need for humanity in our legal system,” said Mitchell.

    MCDC nominates both Michael Dollinger and Karen Bailey Turner as designated candidates for Monroe County Court Judge, as two seats are available for election in 2019. “I am honored to accept the Monroe County Democratic Committee’s designation as a candidate for Monroe County Court Judge. As a lifelong resident of this community, I look forward to working hard to win this election so that I may continue to serve the citizens of Monroe County as County Court Judge,” said Dollinger when accepting the Democratic nomination. He currently serves as Judicial Law Clerk to Monroe County Court Judge Christopher S. Ciaccio, giving him the understanding of the role and the difficult decisions that come before the Court.  Before joining Judge Ciaccio’s chambers, Dollinger served the Rochester community as an Assistant District Attorney for over nine years having been hired by former District Attorney Michael Green. As a prosecutor, he was assigned to the Special Investigations Bureau and prosecuted crimes to get illegal guns and drugs off the streets.

    Bailey Turner is currently an Associate Attorney at the Mental Hygiene Legal Service, New York State Supreme Court, Appellate Division, Fourth Dept., where she represents mentally ill patients in civil proceedings before the County and Supreme Courts. Prior to her current position, Bailey Turner practiced criminal law for over 16 years, both as an Assistant Public Defender and in private practice. In addition, she has also represented civil rights cases in Federal Court. “The fair administration of justice requires that judges know and apply the law equitably; have integrity; treat the litigants who come before them with respect, and are willing and able to be confident, creative, courageous decision-makers who lead from the bench,” Bailey Turner said when announcing her campaign.

    The Honorable Melissa Barrett has obtained the Democratic designation for Rochester City Court Judge. Barrett was appointed to the bench as City Judge last December and seeks election to a full term. “The court’s goal is to provide fairness, respect, and dignity to all who come before it.  The public has a right to demand irreproachable and fair conduct from anyone performing a judicial function. Judges perform one of the most important jobs in our community and we need one who is experienced, committed to justice, and one who strives for the highest standard of integrity,” said Barrett.

    In addition, the Monroe Democrats also nominated Mark Muoio for City Court Judge. “I am deeply honored to receive the democratic nomination in my run for City Judge. I look forward to listening to our residents’ voices as I seek election,” said Muoio. He currently works as director of the Housing and Consumer Law Unit at the Legal Aid Society of Rochester – a nonprofit that provides “direct legal services to low- and moderate-income residents,” serving in that position since 2009.

    The County Legislators– City, Town and Villages– winning the designation nomination from the Democratic Committee are Michelle Ames of the 1st Legislative District (LD), Karen LoBacco of LD 2, Marvin Stepherson of LD 3, Josh Mack, Jr. of LD 4, Terry Daniele of LD 5, Daniel Maloney of LD 6, Jim Leary of the 7th LD, Megan Thompson of LD 8, Catherine Dean of LD 9, incumbent Howard Maffucci of LD 10, Joshua Foladare of LD 11, Michael Yudelson of LD 13, LD 14 incumbent- Justin Wilcox, Carl Fitzsimmons of LD 15, Lorie Barnum of LD 16, LD 17 incumbent Joseph Morelle, Jr., John Baynes for LD 18, James Cook for LD 20,  Victor Sanchez of LD 21, Vince Felder, incumbent, of LD 22, Linda M. Hasman of LD 23, incumbent Joshua Bauroth of LD 24, incumbent John Lightfoot of LD 25, Yversha Roman of LD 26th, incumbent Lashay Harris of LD 27, Frank Keophetlasy of LD 28, and, lastly, incumbent Ernest Flagler-Mitchell of LD 29.

    The Democratic nomination for Rochester City Council goes to Mary Lupien for the East District, Michael Patterson, incumbent, for the Northeast District, LaShana Boose for the Northwest District, and incumbent Adam McFadden for the South District.

    Lastly, the Monroe Democrats also are excited to announce the designated candidates for Rochester City School District Board members are: incumbent commissioner Judith Davis, educator Howard Eagle, Anthony Hall, and Amy Maloy.  

    The Monroe County Democratic Committee is confident that voters will choose to support our team of candidates this election year as our nominated individuals seek to create safer and more vibrant neighborhoods, greater employment and job security, and increase educational opportunities. We are confident that our slate of Democratic candidates embraces what we stand for as a party.